The potential efficacy of psychological first aid on self-reported anxiety and mood: A pilot study

George S. Everly, Jeffrey M. Lating, Martin F. Sherman, Ian Goncher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors explored the efficacy of a randomized controlled trial to assess the potential benefits of psychological first aid (PFA) compared with a social acknowledgement condition in a sample of 42 participants who spoke about a stressful life event. Demographics and standardized questionnaires, including the state version of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory Scale and the Brief Profile of Mood States, assessed anxiety and mood state. Those in the PFA group evidenced significantly lower anxiety scores at 30-minute postdisclosure than at baseline and, although not significant, showed lowered distressed mood compared with baseline at 30-minute postdisclosure. Those in the social acknowledgment condition evidenced increases in anxiety and distressed mood scores, albeit not significantly, at 30 minutes post disclosure compared with their baseline scores. These results provide preliminary empirical evidence for the efficacy of PFA, and implications for intervention and additional assessment are suggested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-235
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume204
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Efficacy
  • PFA
  • POMS
  • Psychological first aid
  • STAI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The potential efficacy of psychological first aid on self-reported anxiety and mood: A pilot study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this