The positive impact of team-based virtual microscopy on student learning in physiology and histology

Harry R. Goldberg, Renee Dintzis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Team-based virtual microscopy and on-line learning were used to transform the first-year Physiology/Histology course at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine into a student-centered learning environment. Prior to each laboratory session, students were required to view prelaboratory virtual lectures and examine digital slides that had been enhanced with annotations and 2-min microlectures. The laboratory classroom was then used for team-based learning exercises including student presentations and small-group discussions designed to integrate histology and physiology. The results of quantitative assessments indicated an 8- to 14-point increase over the identical final exams given over the past 5 yr. Means (±SD) of percent correct answers on the final exam were found to be 75.2% (11.1%), 72.5% (12.6%), 70.5% (12.6%), 73.6% (11.3%), 73.1% (12.2%), and 84.1% (9.1%) for years 2001-2006, respectively. The mean test scores for all other years were statistically lower compared with 2006, as determined by the Bonferroni post hoc multiple-comparison test (P < 0.001 for all years).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-265
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Advances in Physiology Education
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

Keywords

  • Active learning
  • Educational technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

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