The physical costs and psychosocial benefits of travel aids for persons who are visually impaired or blind

L. N. Gitlin, J. Mount, W. Lucas, L. C. Weirich, L. Gramberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated the musculoskeletal consequences of using travel aids, particularly white canes and dog guides, as perceived by 21 individuals, aged 27 to 68 years, who are visually impaired or blind. These individuals experienced a variety of negative physical effects that they either denied, ignored, or minimized because of the fundamental biophysical, psychological, and social benefits derived from being independently mobile and because of the need to attend to environmental cues to ensure safe travel. The implications of these findings for mobility training and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-359
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Visual Impairment and Blindness
Volume91
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Rehabilitation

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