The pharmacogenetics of Type 2 Diabetes: A systematic review

Nisa Maruthur, Matthew O. Gribble, Wendy Bennett, Shari Bolen, Lisa Wilson, Poojitha Balakrishnan, Anita Sahu, Eric B Bass, W. H Linda Kao, Jeanne Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE We performed a systematic review to identify which genetic variants predict response to diabetes medications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a search of electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database) and a manual search to identify original, longitudinal studies of the effect of diabetes medications on incident diabetes, HbA1c, fasting glucose, and postprandial glucose in prediabetes or type 2 diabetes by genetic variation. Two investigators reviewed titles, abstracts, and articles independently. Two investigators abstracted data sequentially and evaluated study quality independently. Quality evaluations were based on the Strengthening the Reporting of Genetic Association Studies guidelines and Human Genome Epidemiology Network guidance. RESULTS Of 7,279 citations, we included 34 articles (N = 10,407) evaluating metformin (n = 14), sulfonylureas (n = 4), repaglinide (n = 8), pioglitazone (n = 3), rosiglitazone (n = 4), and acarbose (n = 4). Studieswere not standalone randomized controlled trials, and most evaluated patients with diabetes. Significant medication-gene interactions for glycemic outcomes included 1) metformin and the SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC47A1, PRKAB2, PRKAA2, PRKAA1, and STK11 loci; 2) sulfonylureas and the CYP2C9 and TCF7L2 loci; 3) repaglinide and the KCNJ11, SLC30A8, NEUROD1/ BETA2, UCP2, and PAX4 loci; 4) pioglitazone and the PPARG2 and PTPRD loci; 5) rosiglitazone and the KCNQ1 and RBP4 loci; and 5) acarbose and the PPARA, HNF4A, LIPC, and PPARGC1A loci. Data were insufficient for meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS We found evidence of pharmacogenetic interactions for metformin, sulfonylureas, repaglinide, thiazolidinediones, and acarbose consistent with their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. While high-quality controlled studies with prespecified analyses are still lacking, our results bring the promise of personalized medicine in diabetes one step closer to fruition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)876-886
Number of pages11
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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