The persistence of clinical questions across shifts on an intensive care unit: An observational pilot study

Blair Anton, Sue M. Woodson, Claire Twose, Nancy K. Roderer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

How do clinical questions emerge and move toward resolution in the intensive care setting over the course of 24 hours? In a 20-bed surgical intensive care unit in a large, tertiary-care teaching hospital, informationists shadowed clinicians for 2 48-hour periods to record questions, noting when they were asked and whether they were answered. Thirty-eight percent of 112 recorded questions remained unanswered. Some unanswered questions persisted across shifts, and clinicians' information-seeking behaviors changed over time. Clinical information services can be improved and integrated more fully into clinical workflows based on a fuller understanding of the life cycle of clinical inquiry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-205
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Medical Library Association
Volume102
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Critical Care
Observational Studies
Intensive Care Units
persistence
Information Seeking Behavior
Information Services
Workflow
Tertiary Healthcare
Life Cycle Stages
Teaching Hospitals
information-seeking behavior
workflow
information service
life cycle
Teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Health Informatics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The persistence of clinical questions across shifts on an intensive care unit : An observational pilot study. / Anton, Blair; Woodson, Sue M.; Twose, Claire; Roderer, Nancy K.

In: Journal of the Medical Library Association, Vol. 102, No. 3, 2014, p. 201-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anton, Blair ; Woodson, Sue M. ; Twose, Claire ; Roderer, Nancy K. / The persistence of clinical questions across shifts on an intensive care unit : An observational pilot study. In: Journal of the Medical Library Association. 2014 ; Vol. 102, No. 3. pp. 201-205.
@article{bbd23ab3d1d3443aa24de4a78dbd8d7c,
title = "The persistence of clinical questions across shifts on an intensive care unit: An observational pilot study",
abstract = "How do clinical questions emerge and move toward resolution in the intensive care setting over the course of 24 hours? In a 20-bed surgical intensive care unit in a large, tertiary-care teaching hospital, informationists shadowed clinicians for 2 48-hour periods to record questions, noting when they were asked and whether they were answered. Thirty-eight percent of 112 recorded questions remained unanswered. Some unanswered questions persisted across shifts, and clinicians' information-seeking behaviors changed over time. Clinical information services can be improved and integrated more fully into clinical workflows based on a fuller understanding of the life cycle of clinical inquiry.",
author = "Blair Anton and Woodson, {Sue M.} and Claire Twose and Roderer, {Nancy K.}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.3163/1536-5050.102.3.011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "102",
pages = "201--205",
journal = "Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA",
issn = "1536-5050",
publisher = "Medical Library Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The persistence of clinical questions across shifts on an intensive care unit

T2 - An observational pilot study

AU - Anton, Blair

AU - Woodson, Sue M.

AU - Twose, Claire

AU - Roderer, Nancy K.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - How do clinical questions emerge and move toward resolution in the intensive care setting over the course of 24 hours? In a 20-bed surgical intensive care unit in a large, tertiary-care teaching hospital, informationists shadowed clinicians for 2 48-hour periods to record questions, noting when they were asked and whether they were answered. Thirty-eight percent of 112 recorded questions remained unanswered. Some unanswered questions persisted across shifts, and clinicians' information-seeking behaviors changed over time. Clinical information services can be improved and integrated more fully into clinical workflows based on a fuller understanding of the life cycle of clinical inquiry.

AB - How do clinical questions emerge and move toward resolution in the intensive care setting over the course of 24 hours? In a 20-bed surgical intensive care unit in a large, tertiary-care teaching hospital, informationists shadowed clinicians for 2 48-hour periods to record questions, noting when they were asked and whether they were answered. Thirty-eight percent of 112 recorded questions remained unanswered. Some unanswered questions persisted across shifts, and clinicians' information-seeking behaviors changed over time. Clinical information services can be improved and integrated more fully into clinical workflows based on a fuller understanding of the life cycle of clinical inquiry.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905270018&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905270018&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3163/1536-5050.102.3.011

DO - 10.3163/1536-5050.102.3.011

M3 - Article

C2 - 25031562

AN - SCOPUS:84905270018

VL - 102

SP - 201

EP - 205

JO - Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA

JF - Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA

SN - 1536-5050

IS - 3

ER -