The perils of gene patents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

I argue here that gene patents, and patented genetic tests based on them, are a very bad idea. First, I discuss whether genes can reasonably be the subject of patents in the first place; I maintain that the answer is no. Second, I explain how gene patents interfere with scientific progress, slowing down the development of new cures and treatments for genetic diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)969-971
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume91
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Patents
Genes
Inborn Genetic Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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The perils of gene patents. / Salzberg, Steven L.

In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 91, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 969-971.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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