The pediatrician and disaster preparedness

Steven E. Krug, Thomas Bojko, Margaret A. Dolan, Karen S. Frush, Patricia J. O'Malley, Robert E. Sapien, Kathy N. Shaw, Joan E. Shook, Paul E. Sirbaugh, Loren G. Yamamato, Jane Ball, Kathleen Brown, Kim Bullock, Dan Kavanaugh, Sharon E. Mace, David W. Tuggle, David Markenson, Susan Tellez, Gary N. McAbee, Steven M. DonnC. Morrison Farish, David Marcus, Robert A. Mendelson, Sally L. Reynolds, Larry Veltman, Holly J. Myers, Julie Kersten Ake, Joseph F. Hagan, Marion J. Balsam, Richard Gorman, Julia Lynch, Julia McMillan, Karen Olness, Gary Peck, Irwin Redlener, David Schonfeld, Michael Shannon, Louis Z. Cooper, E. Stephen Edwards, Carden Johnston, Molly Hicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent natural disasters and events of terrorism and war have heightened society's recognition of the need for emergency preparedness. In addition to the unique pediatric issues involved in general emergency preparedness, several additional issues related to terrorism preparedness must be considered, including the unique vulnerabilities of children to various agents as well as the limited availability of age- and weight-appropriate antidotes and treatments. Although children may respond more rapidly to therapeutic intervention, they are at the same time more susceptible to various agents and conditions and more likely to deteriorate if not monitored carefully. The challenge of dealing with the threat of terrorism, natural disasters, and public health emergencies in the United States is daunting not only for disaster planners but also for our medical system and health professionals of all types, including pediatricians. As part of the network of health responders, pediatricians need to be able to answer concerns of patients and families, recognize signs of possible exposure to a weapon of terror, understand first-line response to such attacks, and sufficiently participate in disaster planning to ensure that the unique needs of children are addressed satisfactorily in the overall process. Pediatricians play a central role in disaster and terrorism preparedness with families, children, and their communities. This applies not only to the general pediatrician but also to the pediatric medical subspecialist and pediatric surgical specialist. Families view pediatricians as their expert resource, and most of them expect the pediatrician to be knowledgeable in areas of concern. Providing expert guidance entails educating families in anticipation of events and responding to questions during and after actual events. It is essential that pediatricians educate themselves regarding these issues of emergency preparedness. For pediatricians, some information is currently available on virtually all of these issues in recently produced printed materials, at special conferences, in broadcasts of various types, and on the Internet. However, selecting appropriate, accurate sources of information and determining how much information is sufficient remain difficult challenges. Similarly, guidance is needed with respect to developing relevant curricula for medical students and postdoctoral clinical trainees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)560-564
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume117
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Disasters
Terrorism
Civil Defense
Pediatrics
Disaster Planning
Antidotes
Weapons
Pediatricians
Health
Medical Students
Internet
Curriculum
Emergencies
Public Health
Weights and Measures
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Bioterrorism
  • Disasters
  • Emergency preparedness
  • Terrorism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Krug, S. E., Bojko, T., Dolan, M. A., Frush, K. S., O'Malley, P. J., Sapien, R. E., ... Hicks, M. (2006). The pediatrician and disaster preparedness. Pediatrics, 117(2), 560-564. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2005-2751

The pediatrician and disaster preparedness. / Krug, Steven E.; Bojko, Thomas; Dolan, Margaret A.; Frush, Karen S.; O'Malley, Patricia J.; Sapien, Robert E.; Shaw, Kathy N.; Shook, Joan E.; Sirbaugh, Paul E.; Yamamato, Loren G.; Ball, Jane; Brown, Kathleen; Bullock, Kim; Kavanaugh, Dan; Mace, Sharon E.; Tuggle, David W.; Markenson, David; Tellez, Susan; McAbee, Gary N.; Donn, Steven M.; Farish, C. Morrison; Marcus, David; Mendelson, Robert A.; Reynolds, Sally L.; Veltman, Larry; Myers, Holly J.; Ake, Julie Kersten; Hagan, Joseph F.; Balsam, Marion J.; Gorman, Richard; Lynch, Julia; McMillan, Julia; Olness, Karen; Peck, Gary; Redlener, Irwin; Schonfeld, David; Shannon, Michael; Cooper, Louis Z.; Edwards, E. Stephen; Johnston, Carden; Hicks, Molly.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 117, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 560-564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krug, SE, Bojko, T, Dolan, MA, Frush, KS, O'Malley, PJ, Sapien, RE, Shaw, KN, Shook, JE, Sirbaugh, PE, Yamamato, LG, Ball, J, Brown, K, Bullock, K, Kavanaugh, D, Mace, SE, Tuggle, DW, Markenson, D, Tellez, S, McAbee, GN, Donn, SM, Farish, CM, Marcus, D, Mendelson, RA, Reynolds, SL, Veltman, L, Myers, HJ, Ake, JK, Hagan, JF, Balsam, MJ, Gorman, R, Lynch, J, McMillan, J, Olness, K, Peck, G, Redlener, I, Schonfeld, D, Shannon, M, Cooper, LZ, Edwards, ES, Johnston, C & Hicks, M 2006, 'The pediatrician and disaster preparedness', Pediatrics, vol. 117, no. 2, pp. 560-564. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2005-2751
Krug SE, Bojko T, Dolan MA, Frush KS, O'Malley PJ, Sapien RE et al. The pediatrician and disaster preparedness. Pediatrics. 2006 Feb;117(2):560-564. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2005-2751
Krug, Steven E. ; Bojko, Thomas ; Dolan, Margaret A. ; Frush, Karen S. ; O'Malley, Patricia J. ; Sapien, Robert E. ; Shaw, Kathy N. ; Shook, Joan E. ; Sirbaugh, Paul E. ; Yamamato, Loren G. ; Ball, Jane ; Brown, Kathleen ; Bullock, Kim ; Kavanaugh, Dan ; Mace, Sharon E. ; Tuggle, David W. ; Markenson, David ; Tellez, Susan ; McAbee, Gary N. ; Donn, Steven M. ; Farish, C. Morrison ; Marcus, David ; Mendelson, Robert A. ; Reynolds, Sally L. ; Veltman, Larry ; Myers, Holly J. ; Ake, Julie Kersten ; Hagan, Joseph F. ; Balsam, Marion J. ; Gorman, Richard ; Lynch, Julia ; McMillan, Julia ; Olness, Karen ; Peck, Gary ; Redlener, Irwin ; Schonfeld, David ; Shannon, Michael ; Cooper, Louis Z. ; Edwards, E. Stephen ; Johnston, Carden ; Hicks, Molly. / The pediatrician and disaster preparedness. In: Pediatrics. 2006 ; Vol. 117, No. 2. pp. 560-564.
@article{8f2efcc8efe647139ebb1c4762d8ac03,
title = "The pediatrician and disaster preparedness",
abstract = "Recent natural disasters and events of terrorism and war have heightened society's recognition of the need for emergency preparedness. In addition to the unique pediatric issues involved in general emergency preparedness, several additional issues related to terrorism preparedness must be considered, including the unique vulnerabilities of children to various agents as well as the limited availability of age- and weight-appropriate antidotes and treatments. Although children may respond more rapidly to therapeutic intervention, they are at the same time more susceptible to various agents and conditions and more likely to deteriorate if not monitored carefully. The challenge of dealing with the threat of terrorism, natural disasters, and public health emergencies in the United States is daunting not only for disaster planners but also for our medical system and health professionals of all types, including pediatricians. As part of the network of health responders, pediatricians need to be able to answer concerns of patients and families, recognize signs of possible exposure to a weapon of terror, understand first-line response to such attacks, and sufficiently participate in disaster planning to ensure that the unique needs of children are addressed satisfactorily in the overall process. Pediatricians play a central role in disaster and terrorism preparedness with families, children, and their communities. This applies not only to the general pediatrician but also to the pediatric medical subspecialist and pediatric surgical specialist. Families view pediatricians as their expert resource, and most of them expect the pediatrician to be knowledgeable in areas of concern. Providing expert guidance entails educating families in anticipation of events and responding to questions during and after actual events. It is essential that pediatricians educate themselves regarding these issues of emergency preparedness. For pediatricians, some information is currently available on virtually all of these issues in recently produced printed materials, at special conferences, in broadcasts of various types, and on the Internet. However, selecting appropriate, accurate sources of information and determining how much information is sufficient remain difficult challenges. Similarly, guidance is needed with respect to developing relevant curricula for medical students and postdoctoral clinical trainees.",
keywords = "Bioterrorism, Disasters, Emergency preparedness, Terrorism",
author = "Krug, {Steven E.} and Thomas Bojko and Dolan, {Margaret A.} and Frush, {Karen S.} and O'Malley, {Patricia J.} and Sapien, {Robert E.} and Shaw, {Kathy N.} and Shook, {Joan E.} and Sirbaugh, {Paul E.} and Yamamato, {Loren G.} and Jane Ball and Kathleen Brown and Kim Bullock and Dan Kavanaugh and Mace, {Sharon E.} and Tuggle, {David W.} and David Markenson and Susan Tellez and McAbee, {Gary N.} and Donn, {Steven M.} and Farish, {C. Morrison} and David Marcus and Mendelson, {Robert A.} and Reynolds, {Sally L.} and Larry Veltman and Myers, {Holly J.} and Ake, {Julie Kersten} and Hagan, {Joseph F.} and Balsam, {Marion J.} and Richard Gorman and Julia Lynch and Julia McMillan and Karen Olness and Gary Peck and Irwin Redlener and David Schonfeld and Michael Shannon and Cooper, {Louis Z.} and Edwards, {E. Stephen} and Carden Johnston and Molly Hicks",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2005-2751",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "117",
pages = "560--564",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The pediatrician and disaster preparedness

AU - Krug, Steven E.

AU - Bojko, Thomas

AU - Dolan, Margaret A.

AU - Frush, Karen S.

AU - O'Malley, Patricia J.

AU - Sapien, Robert E.

AU - Shaw, Kathy N.

AU - Shook, Joan E.

AU - Sirbaugh, Paul E.

AU - Yamamato, Loren G.

AU - Ball, Jane

AU - Brown, Kathleen

AU - Bullock, Kim

AU - Kavanaugh, Dan

AU - Mace, Sharon E.

AU - Tuggle, David W.

AU - Markenson, David

AU - Tellez, Susan

AU - McAbee, Gary N.

AU - Donn, Steven M.

AU - Farish, C. Morrison

AU - Marcus, David

AU - Mendelson, Robert A.

AU - Reynolds, Sally L.

AU - Veltman, Larry

AU - Myers, Holly J.

AU - Ake, Julie Kersten

AU - Hagan, Joseph F.

AU - Balsam, Marion J.

AU - Gorman, Richard

AU - Lynch, Julia

AU - McMillan, Julia

AU - Olness, Karen

AU - Peck, Gary

AU - Redlener, Irwin

AU - Schonfeld, David

AU - Shannon, Michael

AU - Cooper, Louis Z.

AU - Edwards, E. Stephen

AU - Johnston, Carden

AU - Hicks, Molly

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - Recent natural disasters and events of terrorism and war have heightened society's recognition of the need for emergency preparedness. In addition to the unique pediatric issues involved in general emergency preparedness, several additional issues related to terrorism preparedness must be considered, including the unique vulnerabilities of children to various agents as well as the limited availability of age- and weight-appropriate antidotes and treatments. Although children may respond more rapidly to therapeutic intervention, they are at the same time more susceptible to various agents and conditions and more likely to deteriorate if not monitored carefully. The challenge of dealing with the threat of terrorism, natural disasters, and public health emergencies in the United States is daunting not only for disaster planners but also for our medical system and health professionals of all types, including pediatricians. As part of the network of health responders, pediatricians need to be able to answer concerns of patients and families, recognize signs of possible exposure to a weapon of terror, understand first-line response to such attacks, and sufficiently participate in disaster planning to ensure that the unique needs of children are addressed satisfactorily in the overall process. Pediatricians play a central role in disaster and terrorism preparedness with families, children, and their communities. This applies not only to the general pediatrician but also to the pediatric medical subspecialist and pediatric surgical specialist. Families view pediatricians as their expert resource, and most of them expect the pediatrician to be knowledgeable in areas of concern. Providing expert guidance entails educating families in anticipation of events and responding to questions during and after actual events. It is essential that pediatricians educate themselves regarding these issues of emergency preparedness. For pediatricians, some information is currently available on virtually all of these issues in recently produced printed materials, at special conferences, in broadcasts of various types, and on the Internet. However, selecting appropriate, accurate sources of information and determining how much information is sufficient remain difficult challenges. Similarly, guidance is needed with respect to developing relevant curricula for medical students and postdoctoral clinical trainees.

AB - Recent natural disasters and events of terrorism and war have heightened society's recognition of the need for emergency preparedness. In addition to the unique pediatric issues involved in general emergency preparedness, several additional issues related to terrorism preparedness must be considered, including the unique vulnerabilities of children to various agents as well as the limited availability of age- and weight-appropriate antidotes and treatments. Although children may respond more rapidly to therapeutic intervention, they are at the same time more susceptible to various agents and conditions and more likely to deteriorate if not monitored carefully. The challenge of dealing with the threat of terrorism, natural disasters, and public health emergencies in the United States is daunting not only for disaster planners but also for our medical system and health professionals of all types, including pediatricians. As part of the network of health responders, pediatricians need to be able to answer concerns of patients and families, recognize signs of possible exposure to a weapon of terror, understand first-line response to such attacks, and sufficiently participate in disaster planning to ensure that the unique needs of children are addressed satisfactorily in the overall process. Pediatricians play a central role in disaster and terrorism preparedness with families, children, and their communities. This applies not only to the general pediatrician but also to the pediatric medical subspecialist and pediatric surgical specialist. Families view pediatricians as their expert resource, and most of them expect the pediatrician to be knowledgeable in areas of concern. Providing expert guidance entails educating families in anticipation of events and responding to questions during and after actual events. It is essential that pediatricians educate themselves regarding these issues of emergency preparedness. For pediatricians, some information is currently available on virtually all of these issues in recently produced printed materials, at special conferences, in broadcasts of various types, and on the Internet. However, selecting appropriate, accurate sources of information and determining how much information is sufficient remain difficult challenges. Similarly, guidance is needed with respect to developing relevant curricula for medical students and postdoctoral clinical trainees.

KW - Bioterrorism

KW - Disasters

KW - Emergency preparedness

KW - Terrorism

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33644849867&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33644849867&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2005-2751

DO - 10.1542/peds.2005-2751

M3 - Article

C2 - 16452381

AN - SCOPUS:33644849867

VL - 117

SP - 560

EP - 564

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 2

ER -