The pediatric internship as a teaching technique: a comparison of learning experiences in five hospitals

K. Roghmann, P. P. Pizzo, E. Graham, B. Guyer, P. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Five interns joined in a collaborative study to assess their learning experiences during the internship year. A 3X5 inch data form was completed for each patient for whom the intern was responsible. Information was gathered on demographic characteristics of the patient, the teaching that involved this patient, and what skills were acquired. Nearly 30% of the patients were under 1 year of age; 55% were boys. More than one half of the contacts were in an outpatient or emergency department. Over 80% of the patients had not been seen before; continuity patients made up less than 9% of the contacts. Well child care was the largest care category (19%), followed by respiratory problems (15%) and injuries (9%). About 40% of the contacts involved a teaching input, mainly from residents, attending physicians, and faculty. Care skills most frequently acquired were physical examination (49%), reading (15%), and interviewing (11%). Cross tabulations showed that most learning was reported for inpatients, for patients with rare diseases, and when some teaching was involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-245
Number of pages7
JournalPediatrics
Volume56
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1975
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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