The otolaryngology hospitalist: A novel practice paradigm

Matthew S. Russell, David W Eisele, Andrew Murr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis To define a new clinical hospitalist practice paradigm originating at the University of California, San Francisco. Design Retrospective administrative database review at a tertiary referral hospital. Materials and Methods A consortium model of an otolaryngologist hospitalist practice was developed. Billing records, including Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Disease-9 (ICD-9) codes, were reviewed to evaluate the number and type of consultations and surgeries generated during a 2-year period. Results A total of 375 new inpatient consultations generated 951 patient encounters. The most common diagnoses were respiratory failure (12%), sinusitis (10.6%), stridor (10.6%), and dysphonia (7.6%). Twenty-six percent of consultations involved a procedure or surgical intervention, the most common of which were endoscopic sinus surgery, laryngoscopy, and tracheotomy. Conclusions To our knowledge, ours is the first full-time otolaryngology hospitalist model in the United States. The hospitalist practice is a conceptually viable and clinically beneficial paradigm that should be considered at other similar institutions. Level of Evidence N/A.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1394-1398
Number of pages5
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume123
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hospitalists
Otolaryngology
Referral and Consultation
Current Procedural Terminology
Dysphonia
Tracheotomy
Laryngoscopy
San Francisco
Sinusitis
Respiratory Sounds
International Classification of Diseases
Tertiary Care Centers
Respiratory Insufficiency
Inpatients
Databases

Keywords

  • acute care
  • consultation
  • Hospitalist
  • inpatient
  • otolaryngology
  • practice model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

The otolaryngology hospitalist : A novel practice paradigm. / Russell, Matthew S.; Eisele, David W; Murr, Andrew.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 123, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 1394-1398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Russell, Matthew S. ; Eisele, David W ; Murr, Andrew. / The otolaryngology hospitalist : A novel practice paradigm. In: Laryngoscope. 2013 ; Vol. 123, No. 6. pp. 1394-1398.
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