The other side of the engram: Experience-driven changes in neuronal intrinsic excitability

Wei Zhang, David J. Linden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

584 Scopus citations

Abstract

Modern theories of memory storage have largely focused on persistent, experience-dependent changes in synaptic function such as long-term potentiation and depression. But in addition to these synaptic changes, certain learning tasks produce enduring changes in the intrinsic excitability of neurons by changing the function of voltage-gated ion channels, a change that can produce broader, even neuron-wide changes in synaptic throughput. We will consider the evidence for persistent changes in intrinsic neuronal excitability — what we will call intrinsic plasticity — that is produced by training in behaving animals and by artificial patterns of activation in brain slices and neuronal cultures. These intrinsic changes might function as part of the engram itself, or as a related phenomenon such as a trigger for the consolidation or adaptive generalization of memories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)885-900
Number of pages16
JournalNature Reviews Neuroscience
Volume4
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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