The neuropsychology of depression in the elderly: A comparative study of normal aging and Alzheimer's disease

D. A. King, E. D. Caine, Y. Conwell, C. Cox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The neuropsychological testing of 23 elderly depressed patients was compared to that of 23 healthy controls and 20 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Depressed subjects were deficient relative to controls on most tasks, including naming and cued memory. There was a greater negative influence of age on the performance of depressed subjects (relative to controls) on some tasks. Despite their significant deficits, depressed patients were clearly distinguishable from AD patients. It is suggested that the combined effects of age and depression produce a pattern of deficits that is distinct from that of younger depressives, but less severe than that of Alzheimer's patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-168
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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