The negative impact of sugar-sweetened beverages on children's health: An update of the literature

Sara N Bleich, Kelsey A. Vercammen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

While sugar sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption has declined in the last 15 years, consumption of SSBs is still high among children and adolescents. This research synthesis updates a prior review on this topic and examines the evidence regarding the various health impacts of SSBs on children's health (overweight/obesity, insulin resistance, dental caries, and caffeine-related effects). We searched PubMed, CAB Abstracts and PAIS International to identify cross-sectional, longitudinal and intervention studies examining the health impacts of SSBs in children published after January 1, 2007. We also searched reference lists of relevant articles. Overall, most studies found consistent evidence for the negative impact of SSBs on children's health, with the strongest support for overweight/obesity risk and dental caries, and emerging evidence for insulin resistance and caffeine-related effects. The majority of evidence was cross-sectional highlighting the need for more longitudinal and intervention studies to address this research question. There is substantial evidence that SSBs increase the risk of overweight/obesity and dental caries and developing evidence for the negative impact of SSBs on insulin resistance and caffeine-related effects. The vast majority of literature supports the idea that a reduction in SSB consumption would improve children's health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6
JournalBMC Obesity
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 20 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Beverages
Dental Caries
Caffeine
Insulin Resistance
Obesity
Longitudinal Studies
Health
Research
PubMed
Child Health

Keywords

  • Children's health
  • Sugar-sweetened beverages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

The negative impact of sugar-sweetened beverages on children's health : An update of the literature. / Bleich, Sara N; Vercammen, Kelsey A.

In: BMC Obesity, Vol. 5, No. 1, 6, 20.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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