The modality-specific organization of grammatical categories: Evidence from impaired spoken and written sentence production

Brenda C Rapp, Alfonso Caramazza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We describe the case of a brain-damaged individual whose speech is characterized by difficulty with practically all words except for elements of the closed class vocabulary. In contrast, his written sentence production exhibits a complementary impair meal involving the omission of closed class vocabulary items and the relative sparing of nouns. On tile basis of these differences we argue: (1) that grammatical categories constitute an organizing parameter of representation and/or processing for each of the independent modality-specific lexicons, and (2) that these observations contribute to the growing evidence that access to the orthographic and phonological forms of words can occur independently.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-286
Number of pages39
JournalBrain and Language
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1997

Fingerprint

Vocabulary
vocabulary
organization
meals
evidence
Meals
brain
Brain
Modality
Grammatical Categories
Sentence Production
Closed Class
Orthographic
Nouns
Brain-damaged
Lexicon
Omission
Organizing
Meal
Tiles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The modality-specific organization of grammatical categories : Evidence from impaired spoken and written sentence production. / Rapp, Brenda C; Caramazza, Alfonso.

In: Brain and Language, Vol. 56, No. 2, 01.02.1997, p. 248-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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