The minimal important difference in borg dyspnea score in pulmonary arterial hypertension

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rationale: Despite therapeutic advances, pulmonary arterial hypertension remains a disease without a cure. Focusing on symptoms, such as dyspnea, is an important part of assessing response to therapy. Objectives: To determine the minimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea score and the Borg fatigue score in adult patients undergoing initial therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods: We studied 129 patients enrolled between 2003 and 2013 in the Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Program registry at Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. We analyzed baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, 6-minute-walk test distance, and Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores at baseline and at follow up 3months after initiation of pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy. Theminimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores were determined using distributional and anchor-based methods, using 6-minute-walk test distance as the anchor. Measurements and Main Results: Most subjects were in New York Heart Association functional class II or III and had moderate to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. The baseline Borg dyspnea score was 3.4 ±1.9 units; the baseline Borg fatigue score was 2.8 ±2.2 units. After therapy, the average change in the dyspnea score was -0.16 ±1.9 units and the average change in the fatigue score was -0.21 ±2.4 units. Using distributional methods, the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea score ranged from 0.7 to 1.24 units and for Borg fatigue score ranged from 0.73 to 1.39 units. Using anchor-based methods, the minimum important difference for the Borg dyspnea scales was 0.36; this could not be calculated for the Borg fatigue score. Conclusions: Using distributional and anchor-based methods, we estimate the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea scale in pulmonary arterial hypertension is approximately 0.9 units. Using distributional methods only, we estimate the minimum important difference for the Borg fatigue scale is around 1 unit. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical utility of these scores in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)842-849
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the American Thoracic Society
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Hypertension
Dyspnea
Fatigue
Therapeutics
Baltimore
Registries
Demography

Keywords

  • Dyspnea
  • Outcomes
  • Pulmonary hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

The minimal important difference in borg dyspnea score in pulmonary arterial hypertension. / Khair, Rubina M.; Nwaneri, Chisom; Damico, Rachel L; Kolb, Todd Matthew; Hassoun, Paul M; Mathai, Stephen.

In: Annals of the American Thoracic Society, Vol. 13, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 842-849.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{49e7fea02c614a828852a0b80dbbe44e,
title = "The minimal important difference in borg dyspnea score in pulmonary arterial hypertension",
abstract = "Rationale: Despite therapeutic advances, pulmonary arterial hypertension remains a disease without a cure. Focusing on symptoms, such as dyspnea, is an important part of assessing response to therapy. Objectives: To determine the minimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea score and the Borg fatigue score in adult patients undergoing initial therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods: We studied 129 patients enrolled between 2003 and 2013 in the Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Program registry at Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. We analyzed baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, 6-minute-walk test distance, and Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores at baseline and at follow up 3months after initiation of pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy. Theminimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores were determined using distributional and anchor-based methods, using 6-minute-walk test distance as the anchor. Measurements and Main Results: Most subjects were in New York Heart Association functional class II or III and had moderate to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. The baseline Borg dyspnea score was 3.4 ±1.9 units; the baseline Borg fatigue score was 2.8 ±2.2 units. After therapy, the average change in the dyspnea score was -0.16 ±1.9 units and the average change in the fatigue score was -0.21 ±2.4 units. Using distributional methods, the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea score ranged from 0.7 to 1.24 units and for Borg fatigue score ranged from 0.73 to 1.39 units. Using anchor-based methods, the minimum important difference for the Borg dyspnea scales was 0.36; this could not be calculated for the Borg fatigue score. Conclusions: Using distributional and anchor-based methods, we estimate the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea scale in pulmonary arterial hypertension is approximately 0.9 units. Using distributional methods only, we estimate the minimum important difference for the Borg fatigue scale is around 1 unit. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical utility of these scores in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.",
keywords = "Dyspnea, Outcomes, Pulmonary hypertension",
author = "Khair, {Rubina M.} and Chisom Nwaneri and Damico, {Rachel L} and Kolb, {Todd Matthew} and Hassoun, {Paul M} and Stephen Mathai",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1513/AnnalsATS.201512-824OC",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "842--849",
journal = "Annals of the American Thoracic Society",
issn = "2325-6621",
publisher = "American Thoracic Society",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The minimal important difference in borg dyspnea score in pulmonary arterial hypertension

AU - Khair, Rubina M.

AU - Nwaneri, Chisom

AU - Damico, Rachel L

AU - Kolb, Todd Matthew

AU - Hassoun, Paul M

AU - Mathai, Stephen

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - Rationale: Despite therapeutic advances, pulmonary arterial hypertension remains a disease without a cure. Focusing on symptoms, such as dyspnea, is an important part of assessing response to therapy. Objectives: To determine the minimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea score and the Borg fatigue score in adult patients undergoing initial therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods: We studied 129 patients enrolled between 2003 and 2013 in the Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Program registry at Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. We analyzed baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, 6-minute-walk test distance, and Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores at baseline and at follow up 3months after initiation of pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy. Theminimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores were determined using distributional and anchor-based methods, using 6-minute-walk test distance as the anchor. Measurements and Main Results: Most subjects were in New York Heart Association functional class II or III and had moderate to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. The baseline Borg dyspnea score was 3.4 ±1.9 units; the baseline Borg fatigue score was 2.8 ±2.2 units. After therapy, the average change in the dyspnea score was -0.16 ±1.9 units and the average change in the fatigue score was -0.21 ±2.4 units. Using distributional methods, the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea score ranged from 0.7 to 1.24 units and for Borg fatigue score ranged from 0.73 to 1.39 units. Using anchor-based methods, the minimum important difference for the Borg dyspnea scales was 0.36; this could not be calculated for the Borg fatigue score. Conclusions: Using distributional and anchor-based methods, we estimate the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea scale in pulmonary arterial hypertension is approximately 0.9 units. Using distributional methods only, we estimate the minimum important difference for the Borg fatigue scale is around 1 unit. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical utility of these scores in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

AB - Rationale: Despite therapeutic advances, pulmonary arterial hypertension remains a disease without a cure. Focusing on symptoms, such as dyspnea, is an important part of assessing response to therapy. Objectives: To determine the minimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea score and the Borg fatigue score in adult patients undergoing initial therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods: We studied 129 patients enrolled between 2003 and 2013 in the Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Program registry at Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. We analyzed baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, 6-minute-walk test distance, and Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores at baseline and at follow up 3months after initiation of pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy. Theminimal important differences for the Borg dyspnea and fatigue scores were determined using distributional and anchor-based methods, using 6-minute-walk test distance as the anchor. Measurements and Main Results: Most subjects were in New York Heart Association functional class II or III and had moderate to severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. The baseline Borg dyspnea score was 3.4 ±1.9 units; the baseline Borg fatigue score was 2.8 ±2.2 units. After therapy, the average change in the dyspnea score was -0.16 ±1.9 units and the average change in the fatigue score was -0.21 ±2.4 units. Using distributional methods, the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea score ranged from 0.7 to 1.24 units and for Borg fatigue score ranged from 0.73 to 1.39 units. Using anchor-based methods, the minimum important difference for the Borg dyspnea scales was 0.36; this could not be calculated for the Borg fatigue score. Conclusions: Using distributional and anchor-based methods, we estimate the minimum important difference for Borg dyspnea scale in pulmonary arterial hypertension is approximately 0.9 units. Using distributional methods only, we estimate the minimum important difference for the Borg fatigue scale is around 1 unit. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical utility of these scores in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

KW - Dyspnea

KW - Outcomes

KW - Pulmonary hypertension

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84989284810&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84989284810&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201512-824OC

DO - 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201512-824OC

M3 - Article

C2 - 26974862

AN - SCOPUS:84989284810

VL - 13

SP - 842

EP - 849

JO - Annals of the American Thoracic Society

JF - Annals of the American Thoracic Society

SN - 2325-6621

IS - 6

ER -