The longitudinal course of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in velo-cardio-facial syndrome

Kevin M. Antshel, Kaitlin Hendricks, Robert Shprintzen, Wanda Fremont, Anne Marie Higgins, Stephen V. Faraone, Wendy R. Kates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate predictors of persistence of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a large sample of children with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) with and without ADHD followed prospectively into adolescence. Study design: Children with VCFS with (n = 37) and without (n = 35) ADHD who were on average 11 years old at the baseline assessment and 15 years old at the follow-up assessment were comprehensively assessed with structured diagnostic interviews and assessments of behavioral, cognitive, social, school, and family functioning. Control participants both with and without ADHD were also followed prospectively. Results: In adolescence, 65% of children with VCFS continued to have findings consistent with ADHD. Childhood predictors of persistence were higher rates of familial ADHD, having childhood depression, having higher levels of hyperactivity, and a larger number of intrusion errors on a verbal list learning test at baseline. Approximately 15% of children with VCFS who did not have ADHD at Time 1 met diagnostic criteria for ADHD at Time 2. All of these children had subthreshold ADHD symptoms at Time 1. Conclusions: These findings prospectively confirm that persistence of ADHD into adolescence in VCFS is predicted by childhood variables that have been previously documented in the non-VCFS ADHD literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume163
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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DiGeorge Syndrome
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Verbal Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Antshel, K. M., Hendricks, K., Shprintzen, R., Fremont, W., Higgins, A. M., Faraone, S. V., & Kates, W. R. (2013). The longitudinal course of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in velo-cardio-facial syndrome. Journal of Pediatrics, 163(1). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.12.026

The longitudinal course of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in velo-cardio-facial syndrome. / Antshel, Kevin M.; Hendricks, Kaitlin; Shprintzen, Robert; Fremont, Wanda; Higgins, Anne Marie; Faraone, Stephen V.; Kates, Wendy R.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 163, No. 1, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Antshel, KM, Hendricks, K, Shprintzen, R, Fremont, W, Higgins, AM, Faraone, SV & Kates, WR 2013, 'The longitudinal course of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in velo-cardio-facial syndrome', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 163, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.12.026
Antshel, Kevin M. ; Hendricks, Kaitlin ; Shprintzen, Robert ; Fremont, Wanda ; Higgins, Anne Marie ; Faraone, Stephen V. ; Kates, Wendy R. / The longitudinal course of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in velo-cardio-facial syndrome. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2013 ; Vol. 163, No. 1.
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