The Long-Term Efficacy of a Behavioral Parent Training Intervention for Families with 2-Year-Olds

Sharon Tucker, Deborah Ann Gross, Lou Fogg, Kathleen Delaney, Ron Lapporte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effectiveness of a behavioral parent training (BPT) intervention for improving maternal self-efficacy, maternal stress, and the quality of mother-toddler interactions has been demonstrated (Gross, Fogg, & Tucker, 1995). The 1-year follow-up of the 46 parents of toddlers (assigned to an intervention or comparison group) who participated in that study is reported. It was hypothesized that (a) BPT would lead to enduring positive changes in parenting self-efficacy parenting stress, and parent-toddler interactions; and (b) the amount of parent participation in the intervention would be correlated with greater gains in parent-child outcomes at 1 year. All the families were retained and significant gains in maternal self-efficacy, maternal stress, and mother-child interactions were maintained. Minimal BPT effects were found for fathers. BPT dosage was related to reductions in mother critical statements and negative physical behaviors at 1-year postintervention. The findings are consistent with self-efficacy theory and support parenting self-efficacy as a target for BPT in families of young children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-210
Number of pages12
JournalResearch in Nursing and Health
Volume21
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Mothers
Parenting
Mother-Child Relations
Fathers
Parents

Keywords

  • Behavioral parent training (BPT)
  • Parent-child interactions
  • Self-efficacy
  • Toddlers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

The Long-Term Efficacy of a Behavioral Parent Training Intervention for Families with 2-Year-Olds. / Tucker, Sharon; Gross, Deborah Ann; Fogg, Lou; Delaney, Kathleen; Lapporte, Ron.

In: Research in Nursing and Health, Vol. 21, No. 3, 06.1998, p. 199-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tucker, Sharon ; Gross, Deborah Ann ; Fogg, Lou ; Delaney, Kathleen ; Lapporte, Ron. / The Long-Term Efficacy of a Behavioral Parent Training Intervention for Families with 2-Year-Olds. In: Research in Nursing and Health. 1998 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 199-210.
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