The link between infant neuropsychological risk and childhood antisocial behavior among males: The moderating role of neonatal health risk

Dylan B. Jackson, Jamie Newsome

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose The current study examines the association between infant neuropsychological risk and childhood antisocial behavior, and whether neonatal health risk moderates this association. Methods Longitudinal data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) were analyzed using hierarchical regression. Results The findings suggest that the association between infant neuropsychological risk and childhood antisocial behavior is contingent on both biological sex and neonatal health risk. Males who experienced neonatal health risks exhibited significantly higher levels of childhood antisocial behavior as neuropsychological risk during infancy increased. Conclusions The relationship between neuropsychological risks and childhood antisocial behavior may be exacerbated by neonatal health risks among males. Implications for theory, prevention, and intervention are considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-40
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume47
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antisocial behavior
  • Childhood
  • Infancy
  • Moderating effects
  • Neonatal health
  • Neuropsychological risks
  • Perinatal risks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The link between infant neuropsychological risk and childhood antisocial behavior among males: The moderating role of neonatal health risk'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this