The limits of compulsion in controlling AIDS.

L. Gostin, W. J. Curran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Public health officials are coming under pressure to implement compulsory measures to check the rapid spread of AIDS. The authors were asked by the United States Assistant Secretary for Health to study legal and regulatory methods for controlling the spread of AIDS, and a report they coauthored with Mary Clark, Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Legal, Regulatory and Policy Analysis, was issued by DHHS in 1986. In this article, an outgrowth of that study, Gostin and Curran examine four proposed control measures that impinge directly on individual liberty: contact tracing, general isolation or quarantine, modified isolation based on behavior likely to transmit AIDS, and deterrence through criminal penalties. They conclude that the measures would do little to slow the spread of AIDS and might even be counterproductive. In addition, these proposals would unduly restrict the liberty, autonomy, and privacy of persons vulnerable to AIDS infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe Hastings Center report
Volume16
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

compulsion
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
social isolation
Contact Tracing
United States Dept. of Health and Human Services
Quarantine
Privacy
Policy Making
deterrence
assistant
privacy
penalty
Public Health
public health
autonomy
AIDS/HIV
contact
Pressure
human being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nursing(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The limits of compulsion in controlling AIDS. / Gostin, L.; Curran, W. J.

In: The Hastings Center report, Vol. 16, No. 6, 12.1986.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gostin, L & Curran, WJ 1986, 'The limits of compulsion in controlling AIDS.', The Hastings Center report, vol. 16, no. 6.
Gostin, L. ; Curran, W. J. / The limits of compulsion in controlling AIDS. In: The Hastings Center report. 1986 ; Vol. 16, No. 6.
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