The lateralizing significance of versive head and eye movements during epileptic seizures

Elaine Wyllie, Hans Lüders, Harold H. Morris, Ronald P. Lesser, Dudley S. Dinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We studied 31 patients who had head and eye turning during 14 spontaneous epileptic seizures. Videotapes and EEGs were analyzed independently. Turning movements were classified without knowledge of EEG or clinical data as either versive (unquestionably forced and involuntary, resulting in sustained unnatural positioning) or nonversive (mild, unsustained, wandering, or seemingly voluntary). Videotape observations were then correlated with the EEG location of seizure onset. Contralateral versive head and eye movements occurred during 61 seizures in 27 patients, but ipsilateral versive movements did not occur. Nonversive lateral head and eye movements occurred ipsilaterally and contralaterally with equal frequency and were nonlocalizing, but versive movement was a reliable lateralizing sign.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)606-611
Number of pages6
JournalNeurology
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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