The January 2013 Beijing “Airpocalypse” and its acute effects on emergency and outpatient visits at a Beijing Hospital

Joshua M. Ferreri, Roger Peng, Michelle L. Bell, Liu Ya, Tiantian Li, G. Brooke Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Severe air pollution episodes in Europe and the USA in the early- to mid-twentieth century caused large health impacts, spurring national legislation. Similarly severe episodes currently affect developing regions, as exemplified by a particularly extreme episode in January 2013 in Beijing, China. We investigated associations between this episode and medical visits at a Beijing hospital. We obtained fine particulate matter (PM2.5) measurements from the US State Department’s Embassy monitor and daily counts of all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory emergency visits, and outpatient visits from a nearby hospital in the Liufang Nanli community. We analyzed whether risks increased during this episode (with daily PM2.5 ≥ 350 μg/m3) using generalized linear modeling, controlling for potential confounders. The episode brought exceptionally high PM2.5 (peak daily average, 569 μg/m3). Risk increased during the episode for all-cause (relative risk 1.29 [95% CI 1.13, 1.46]), cardiovascular (1.55 [0.90, 2.68]) and respiratory (1.33 [1.10, 1.62]) emergency medical visits, and respiratory outpatient visits (1.16 [1.00, 1.33]). Relative risks of all-cause (0.95 [0.82, 1.10]) and cardiovascular (0.83 [0.67, 1.02]) outpatient visits were not statistically significant. Results were robust to modeling choices and episode definitions. This episode was extraordinarily severe, with maximum daily PM2.5 concentration nearly 22-fold above the World Health Organization guideline. During the episode, risk increased for all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory emergency medical visits, and respiratory outpatient visits, consistent with previous US-based research. However, no association was found for all-cause or cardiovascular outpatient visits. China-based studies like this one provide critical evidence in developing efforts regarding air pollution remediation in China.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-309
Number of pages9
JournalAir Quality, Atmosphere and Health
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 29 2017

Fingerprint

Emergencies
Outpatients
China
Air Pollution
Air pollution
atmospheric pollution
Health
Particulate Matter
health impact
World Health Organization
Legislation
twentieth century
modeling
particulate matter
remediation
Beijing
effect
hospital
Guidelines
fold

Keywords

  • Air pollution epidemiology
  • Cardiorespiratory outcomes
  • China
  • Fine particulate matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

The January 2013 Beijing “Airpocalypse” and its acute effects on emergency and outpatient visits at a Beijing Hospital. / Ferreri, Joshua M.; Peng, Roger; Bell, Michelle L.; Ya, Liu; Li, Tiantian; Brooke Anderson, G.

In: Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health, Vol. 11, No. 3, 29.12.2017, p. 301-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferreri, Joshua M. ; Peng, Roger ; Bell, Michelle L. ; Ya, Liu ; Li, Tiantian ; Brooke Anderson, G. / The January 2013 Beijing “Airpocalypse” and its acute effects on emergency and outpatient visits at a Beijing Hospital. In: Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health. 2017 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 301-309.
@article{a2f7ecdc794642bb954eb1eb3d60916d,
title = "The January 2013 Beijing “Airpocalypse” and its acute effects on emergency and outpatient visits at a Beijing Hospital",
abstract = "Severe air pollution episodes in Europe and the USA in the early- to mid-twentieth century caused large health impacts, spurring national legislation. Similarly severe episodes currently affect developing regions, as exemplified by a particularly extreme episode in January 2013 in Beijing, China. We investigated associations between this episode and medical visits at a Beijing hospital. We obtained fine particulate matter (PM2.5) measurements from the US State Department’s Embassy monitor and daily counts of all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory emergency visits, and outpatient visits from a nearby hospital in the Liufang Nanli community. We analyzed whether risks increased during this episode (with daily PM2.5 ≥ 350 μg/m3) using generalized linear modeling, controlling for potential confounders. The episode brought exceptionally high PM2.5 (peak daily average, 569 μg/m3). Risk increased during the episode for all-cause (relative risk 1.29 [95{\%} CI 1.13, 1.46]), cardiovascular (1.55 [0.90, 2.68]) and respiratory (1.33 [1.10, 1.62]) emergency medical visits, and respiratory outpatient visits (1.16 [1.00, 1.33]). Relative risks of all-cause (0.95 [0.82, 1.10]) and cardiovascular (0.83 [0.67, 1.02]) outpatient visits were not statistically significant. Results were robust to modeling choices and episode definitions. This episode was extraordinarily severe, with maximum daily PM2.5 concentration nearly 22-fold above the World Health Organization guideline. During the episode, risk increased for all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory emergency medical visits, and respiratory outpatient visits, consistent with previous US-based research. However, no association was found for all-cause or cardiovascular outpatient visits. China-based studies like this one provide critical evidence in developing efforts regarding air pollution remediation in China.",
keywords = "Air pollution epidemiology, Cardiorespiratory outcomes, China, Fine particulate matter",
author = "Ferreri, {Joshua M.} and Roger Peng and Bell, {Michelle L.} and Liu Ya and Tiantian Li and {Brooke Anderson}, G.",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1007/s11869-017-0538-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "301--309",
journal = "Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health",
issn = "1873-9318",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The January 2013 Beijing “Airpocalypse” and its acute effects on emergency and outpatient visits at a Beijing Hospital

AU - Ferreri, Joshua M.

AU - Peng, Roger

AU - Bell, Michelle L.

AU - Ya, Liu

AU - Li, Tiantian

AU - Brooke Anderson, G.

PY - 2017/12/29

Y1 - 2017/12/29

N2 - Severe air pollution episodes in Europe and the USA in the early- to mid-twentieth century caused large health impacts, spurring national legislation. Similarly severe episodes currently affect developing regions, as exemplified by a particularly extreme episode in January 2013 in Beijing, China. We investigated associations between this episode and medical visits at a Beijing hospital. We obtained fine particulate matter (PM2.5) measurements from the US State Department’s Embassy monitor and daily counts of all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory emergency visits, and outpatient visits from a nearby hospital in the Liufang Nanli community. We analyzed whether risks increased during this episode (with daily PM2.5 ≥ 350 μg/m3) using generalized linear modeling, controlling for potential confounders. The episode brought exceptionally high PM2.5 (peak daily average, 569 μg/m3). Risk increased during the episode for all-cause (relative risk 1.29 [95% CI 1.13, 1.46]), cardiovascular (1.55 [0.90, 2.68]) and respiratory (1.33 [1.10, 1.62]) emergency medical visits, and respiratory outpatient visits (1.16 [1.00, 1.33]). Relative risks of all-cause (0.95 [0.82, 1.10]) and cardiovascular (0.83 [0.67, 1.02]) outpatient visits were not statistically significant. Results were robust to modeling choices and episode definitions. This episode was extraordinarily severe, with maximum daily PM2.5 concentration nearly 22-fold above the World Health Organization guideline. During the episode, risk increased for all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory emergency medical visits, and respiratory outpatient visits, consistent with previous US-based research. However, no association was found for all-cause or cardiovascular outpatient visits. China-based studies like this one provide critical evidence in developing efforts regarding air pollution remediation in China.

AB - Severe air pollution episodes in Europe and the USA in the early- to mid-twentieth century caused large health impacts, spurring national legislation. Similarly severe episodes currently affect developing regions, as exemplified by a particularly extreme episode in January 2013 in Beijing, China. We investigated associations between this episode and medical visits at a Beijing hospital. We obtained fine particulate matter (PM2.5) measurements from the US State Department’s Embassy monitor and daily counts of all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory emergency visits, and outpatient visits from a nearby hospital in the Liufang Nanli community. We analyzed whether risks increased during this episode (with daily PM2.5 ≥ 350 μg/m3) using generalized linear modeling, controlling for potential confounders. The episode brought exceptionally high PM2.5 (peak daily average, 569 μg/m3). Risk increased during the episode for all-cause (relative risk 1.29 [95% CI 1.13, 1.46]), cardiovascular (1.55 [0.90, 2.68]) and respiratory (1.33 [1.10, 1.62]) emergency medical visits, and respiratory outpatient visits (1.16 [1.00, 1.33]). Relative risks of all-cause (0.95 [0.82, 1.10]) and cardiovascular (0.83 [0.67, 1.02]) outpatient visits were not statistically significant. Results were robust to modeling choices and episode definitions. This episode was extraordinarily severe, with maximum daily PM2.5 concentration nearly 22-fold above the World Health Organization guideline. During the episode, risk increased for all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory emergency medical visits, and respiratory outpatient visits, consistent with previous US-based research. However, no association was found for all-cause or cardiovascular outpatient visits. China-based studies like this one provide critical evidence in developing efforts regarding air pollution remediation in China.

KW - Air pollution epidemiology

KW - Cardiorespiratory outcomes

KW - China

KW - Fine particulate matter

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053428849&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053428849&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11869-017-0538-0

DO - 10.1007/s11869-017-0538-0

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85039758412

VL - 11

SP - 301

EP - 309

JO - Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health

JF - Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health

SN - 1873-9318

IS - 3

ER -