The inverted pyramid of biomarker-driven trials

Ignacio Garrido-Laguna, Manuel Hidalgo, Razelle Kurzrock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the past, clinical phase I trials often suffered from low response rates and inadequate experimental drug doses. Over the past decade, however, phase I trials have evolved from simple dose-finding studies to trials that might provide clinically relevant therapeutic opportunities for patients with advanced-stage cancer for which no standard therapies are available. In the future, the routine use of modern technologies such as large-scale genome sequencing will help to unravel the specific biology of a patient's cancer. Such tools will expand our knowledge about genetic aberrations and might provide opportunities for the development of novel, molecular targeted therapies for patients with refractory cancer. Increasingly, the focus will likely turn from carrying out large randomized trials in unselected patients to conducting smaller biomarker-driven trials in selected patients with known molecular aberrations. We expect that these new strategies will enhance response rates as appropriate patients are targeted, therefore sparing those patients who are unlikely to benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)562-566
Number of pages5
JournalNature Reviews Clinical Oncology
Volume8
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Biomarkers
Molecular Targeted Therapy
Neoplasms
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Genome
Technology
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

The inverted pyramid of biomarker-driven trials. / Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Hidalgo, Manuel; Kurzrock, Razelle.

In: Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, Vol. 8, No. 9, 09.2011, p. 562-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garrido-Laguna, I, Hidalgo, M & Kurzrock, R 2011, 'The inverted pyramid of biomarker-driven trials', Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, vol. 8, no. 9, pp. 562-566. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrclinonc.2011.113
Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio ; Hidalgo, Manuel ; Kurzrock, Razelle. / The inverted pyramid of biomarker-driven trials. In: Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology. 2011 ; Vol. 8, No. 9. pp. 562-566.
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