The intraperitoneal delivery of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: studies on the regional delivery advantage

Richard L. Wahl, Jeffrey Barrett, Onelio Geatti, Monica Liebert, Barry S. Wilson, Susan Fisher, John G. Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The i.p. delivery of murine monoclonal antibody was compared with i.v. delivery in normal mice and rats, in normal nude mice and in those with i.p. human ovarian carcinoma xenografts. In normal rats, all classes of antibodies and antibody fragments evaluated were cleared from the peritoneal cavity at comparable rates. The regional delivery (Rd1) advantage to the peritoneal cavity following i.p. delivery was thus most dependent on the rate of clearance of the antibody or fragment from the blood stream. Determining the exact i.p. delivery advantage was problematic due to the difficulty in reliably obtaining peritoneal fluid later than 9-10 h after i.p. injection in normal animals. During the first 9 h following i.p. injection, the Rd(0-9/0-9) was, for a murine IgG2ak Fab>F(ab′)2>IgG (at 13.6>10>7.9). Two murine IgMs evaluated differed in Rd(0-9) at 27.1 and 9.2 respectively. When blood levels were extrapolated to infinity, these Rd (0-9/∞) values were considerably lower with the Fab having the highest Rd at 4.67. The i.p. Rd advantage was almost solely due to the i.p. antibody levels seen in the first 24 h after injection, as after that time, blood levels become comparable to those seen following i.v. injection. Normal tissues obtained at sacrifice 5-7 days after i.p. injection. Normal tissues obtained at sacrifice 5-7 days after i.p. or i.v. injection in rats showed comparable levels of radioantibody activity, whether the injection was i.p. or i.v. (except for higher diaphragmatic levels following i.p. delivery). In nude mice with i.p. human-derived ovarian tumors, intact IgG clearance from the peritoneal cavity to the blood was considerably slower than in normal animals, and early i.p. tumor uptake of specific antibody was significantly higher than that following i.v. antibody delivery. With higher early tumor uptake and lower systemic exposure, early tumor/nontumor ratios were significantly greater than those for i.v. delivery, though not beyond 48 h after i.p. injection. This study demonstrates the pharmacokinetic rationale for i.p. monoclonal antibody delivery, especially for agents cleared rapidly from the blood, such as antibody fragments. In addition, definite i.p. delivery benefit for antibody specific to i.p. tumors in the i.p. ovarian cancer system was shown soon after injection. These data regarding i.p. antibody delivery should be useful in rationally planning diagnostic and therapeutic studies involving the i.p. delivery of unmodified and immunoconjugated monoclonal antibodies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-201
Number of pages15
JournalCancer Immunology Immunotherapy
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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