The intelligent reflex

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The seeming distinction between motor and cognitive skills has hinged on the fact that the former are automatic and non-propositional (knowing-how), whereas the latter are slow and deliberative (knowing-that). Here, the physiological and behavioral phenomenon of long-latency stretch reflexes is used to show that “knowing-that” can be incorporated into “knowing-how,” either immediately or through learning. The experimental demonstration that slow computations can, with practice, be cached for fast retrieval, without the need for re-computation, dissolves the intellectualist/anti-intellectualist distinction: All complex human tasks, at any level of expertise, are a combination of intelligent reflexes and deliberative decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)822-830
Number of pages9
JournalPhilosophical Psychology
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Physiological Phenomena
Stretch Reflex
Motor Skills
Reflex
Learning
Intellectualist
Knowing-how
Expertise
Latency

Keywords

  • automaticity
  • knowing how
  • knowing what
  • Motor
  • reflex
  • skill

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Philosophy

Cite this

The intelligent reflex. / Krakauer, John.

In: Philosophical Psychology, Vol. 32, No. 5, 01.01.2019, p. 822-830.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krakauer, John. / The intelligent reflex. In: Philosophical Psychology. 2019 ; Vol. 32, No. 5. pp. 822-830.
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