The innate and adaptive response to mosquito saliva and Plasmodium sporozoites in the skin

Christine S. Hopp, Photini Sinnis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A malaria infection begins when an infected mosquito takes a blood meal and inoculates parasites into the skin of its mammalian host. The parasite then has to exit the skin and escape the immune cells that protect the body from infection and alert the system to intruding pathogens. It has become apparent that this earliest stage of infection is amenable to vaccine interventions. Here, we discuss how the innate and adaptive host response to both mosquito saliva and the parasite may interfere with the infection, as well as possible mechanisms the parasite might use to circumvent the host defense.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-43
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1342
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • Dermal immune system
  • Human adaptive immunity
  • Human innate immunity
  • Malaria
  • Mosquito saliva
  • Rodent malaria model
  • Sporozoite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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