The Influence of PrEP-Related Stigma and Social Support on PrEP-Use Disclosure among Women Who Inject Drugs and Social Network Members

Marisa Felsher, Karley Dutra, Brent Monseur, Alexis M. Roth, Carl Latkin, Oluwaseun Falade-Nwulia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising but underutilized HIV prevention strategy for Women who Inject Drugs (WWID). Stigma and disclosure concerns have been key barriers to PrEP use among women in PrEP efficacy trials. Social support has been found to buffer against some PrEP stigma, though these factors have been largely unexplored among WWID. Investigating how WWID disclose PrEP use is important given evidence that disclosure is associated with higher adherence. We aimed to identify the impact of stigma and support on PrEP disclosure within social networks of WWID participating in a PrEP demonstration project in Philadelphia, PA, USA. PrEP-using WWID ≥ 18 years completed social network surveys. Generalized estimating equations were used to account for the correlation of network structure. Thirty-nine WWID (i.e. egos) named an average of 9.5 ± 3.3 network members (i.e. alters), for a total sample of 371 unique relationships. Egos disclosed their PrEP use to an average of 4.0 alters (SD = 2.8). Related to PrEP stigma, participants had 0.4 times decreased odds of PrEP disclosure with alters who would disapprove of them taking PrEP (95% CI: 0.1–0.9). Related to support, participants had 2.5 times higher odds of disclosure among peers who could provide PrEP advice (95% CI: 1.0–6.0). Interventions that increase social support and decrease stigma are pivotal for increasing PrEP use disclosure among WWID.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS and behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Pre-exposure prophylaxis
  • Social networks
  • Women who inject drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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