The influence of mistrust, racism, religious participation, and access to care on patient satisfaction for African American men: The North Carolina-Louisiana prostate cancer project

Angelo D. Moore, Jill B. Hamilton, George J. Knafl, P. A. Godley, William R. Carpenter, Jeannette T. Bensen, James L. Mohler, Merle Mishel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore whether a particular combination of individual characteristics influences patient satisfaction with the health care system among a sample of African American men in North Carolina with prostate cancer. Patient satisfaction may be relevant for improving African American men's use of regular care, thus improving the early detection of prostate cancer and attenuating racial disparities in prostate cancer outcomes. Methods: This descriptive correlation study examined relationships of individual characteristics that influence patient satisfaction using data from 505 African American men from North Carolina, who prospectively enrolled in the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project from September 2004 to November 2007. Analyses consisted of univariate statistics, bivariate analysis, and multiple regression analysis. Results: The variables selected for the final model were: participation in religious activities, mistrust, racism, and perceived access to care. In this study, both cultural variables, mistrust (p =

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-68
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume105
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Racism
Patient Satisfaction
African Americans
Prostatic Neoplasms
Early Detection of Cancer
Regression Analysis
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Mistrust
  • Racism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The influence of mistrust, racism, religious participation, and access to care on patient satisfaction for African American men : The North Carolina-Louisiana prostate cancer project. / Moore, Angelo D.; Hamilton, Jill B.; Knafl, George J.; Godley, P. A.; Carpenter, William R.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Mohler, James L.; Mishel, Merle.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 105, No. 1, 03.2013, p. 59-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moore, Angelo D. ; Hamilton, Jill B. ; Knafl, George J. ; Godley, P. A. ; Carpenter, William R. ; Bensen, Jeannette T. ; Mohler, James L. ; Mishel, Merle. / The influence of mistrust, racism, religious participation, and access to care on patient satisfaction for African American men : The North Carolina-Louisiana prostate cancer project. In: Journal of the National Medical Association. 2013 ; Vol. 105, No. 1. pp. 59-68.
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