The influence of human capital and perceived university support on patent applications of biomedical investigators

Supriya Munshaw, Soo Hoon Lee, Phillip H. Phan, Kieren A. Marr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Bayh–Doyle Act of 1980 accelerated academic entrepreneurship in universities. However, not all qualified researchers sought to be involved in patenting. We compared researchers’ human capital and their perceptions of resource availability on patent applications. We collected primary data from biomedical principal investigators from 15 universities using a validated questionnaire. Our results from logistic regression strongly suggest that human capital had a stronger influence than perceptions of resource availability for commercialization activities on patent applications. The policy implications are that universities should seek to enhance the stock of human capital most associated with patenting behaviors to improve academic entrepreneurial outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Technology Transfer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 19 2018

Keywords

  • Human capital
  • Organizational support
  • Resource availability
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Accounting
  • Engineering(all)

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