The influence of gender on respiratory outcomes in children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia during the first 3 years of life

Joseph M. Collaco, Angela D. Aherrera, Sharon A. McGrath-Morrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Since premature males are more likely to be diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia we hypothesized that differences in respiratory outcomes after initial hospital discharge and during the first 3 years of life would exist between females and males diagnosed with BPD. Methods: Subjects with the diagnosis of BPD were recruited from the Johns Hopkins Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Clinic between 2008 and 2014. Clinical features were assessed through chart review (n = 482). Respiratory morbidities were assessed by caregiver questionnaires at clinic visits (n = 429), including emergency department visits, hospital admissions, systemic steroid use, and antibiotic use for respiratory reasons since the last BPD clinic visit or after initial hospital discharge if assessed at the first visit. Results: Male infants weighed significantly more at birth, had higher birth weight percentiles and were more likely to be non-white compared to female infants. The frequency of ever acute care use was 36.9% for emergency department visits, 27.4% for hospital admissions, 36.9% for systemic steroid use, and 40.5% for antibiotic use for a respiratory illness. No differences in respiratory morbidities were found between males and females. Females however, tended to be weaned from supplemental oxygen over 3 months later than males. Conclusions: Compared to females with BPD, males were more likely to weigh more, have higher birth weight percentiles and be non-white. After initial hospital discharge, there were no difference in respiratory morbidities between males and females with BPD. Female infants however were more likely to be weaned from supplemental oxygen at a later age than male infants. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:217–224.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-224
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric pulmonology
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Keywords

  • bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • gender
  • prematurity
  • preterm
  • sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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