The influence of evidence volatility on choice, reaction time and confidence in a perceptual decision

Ariel Zylberberg, Christopher Fetsch, Michael N. Shadlen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many decisions are thought to arise via the accumulation of noisy evidence to a threshold or bound. In perception, the mechanism explains the effect of stimulus strength, characterized by signal-to-noise ratio, on decision speed, accuracy and confidence. It also makes intriguing predictions about the noise itself. An increase in noise should lead to faster decisions, reduced accuracy and, paradoxically, higher confidence. To test these predictions, we introduce a novel sensory manipulation that mimics the addition of unbiased noise to motion-selective regions of visual cortex, which we verified with neuronal recordings from macaque areas MT/MST. For both humans and monkeys, increasing the noise induced faster decisions and greater confidence over a range of stimuli for which accuracy was minimally impaired. The magnitude of the effects was in agreement with predictions of a bounded evidence accumulation model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere17688
JournaleLife
Volume5
Issue numberOCTOBER2016
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 27 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Volatilization
Noise
Signal to noise ratio
Macaca
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Visual Cortex
Haplorhini

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

The influence of evidence volatility on choice, reaction time and confidence in a perceptual decision. / Zylberberg, Ariel; Fetsch, Christopher; Shadlen, Michael N.

In: eLife, Vol. 5, No. OCTOBER2016, e17688, 27.10.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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