The influence of emotional stimuli on attention orienting and inhibitory control in pediatric anxiety

Sven C. Mueller, Michael G. Hardin, Karin Mogg, Valerie Benson, Brendan P. Bradley, Marie Louise Reinholdt-Dunne, Simon P. Liversedge, Daniel S. Pine, Monique Ernst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent in children and adolescents, and are associated with aberrant emotion-related attention orienting and inhibitory control. While recent studies conducted with high-trait anxious adults have employed novel emotion-modified antisaccade tasks to examine the influence of emotional information on orienting and inhibition, similar studies have yet to be conducted in youths. Methods: Participants were 22 children/adolescents diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, and 22 age-matched healthy comparison youths. Participants completed an emotion-modified antisaccade task that was similar to those used in studies of high-trait anxious adults. This task probed the influence of abruptly appearing neutral, happy, angry, or fear stimuli on orienting (prosaccade) or inhibitory (antisaccade) responses. Results: Anxious compared to healthy children showed facilitated orienting toward angry stimuli. With respect to inhibitory processes, threat-related information improved antisaccade accuracy in healthy but not anxious youth. These findings were not linked to individual levels of reported anxiety or specific anxiety disorders. Conclusions: Findings suggest that anxious relative to healthy children manifest enhanced orienting toward threat-related stimuli. In addition, the current findings suggest that threat may modulate inhibitory control during adolescent development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)856-863
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume53
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anxiety
Pediatrics
Anxiety Disorders
Emotions
Adolescent Development
Fear

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • bias
  • children
  • development
  • emotion
  • inhibition
  • orienting
  • saccade

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The influence of emotional stimuli on attention orienting and inhibitory control in pediatric anxiety. / Mueller, Sven C.; Hardin, Michael G.; Mogg, Karin; Benson, Valerie; Bradley, Brendan P.; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise; Liversedge, Simon P.; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, Vol. 53, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 856-863.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mueller, SC, Hardin, MG, Mogg, K, Benson, V, Bradley, BP, Reinholdt-Dunne, ML, Liversedge, SP, Pine, DS & Ernst, M 2012, 'The influence of emotional stimuli on attention orienting and inhibitory control in pediatric anxiety', Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, vol. 53, no. 8, pp. 856-863. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2012.02541.x
Mueller, Sven C. ; Hardin, Michael G. ; Mogg, Karin ; Benson, Valerie ; Bradley, Brendan P. ; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise ; Liversedge, Simon P. ; Pine, Daniel S. ; Ernst, Monique. / The influence of emotional stimuli on attention orienting and inhibitory control in pediatric anxiety. In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines. 2012 ; Vol. 53, No. 8. pp. 856-863.
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