The influence of comorbid asthma on the severity of symptoms in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

Adrienne P. Borschuk, Casey Rodweller, Cynthia F. Salorio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The current study examined the association between asthma and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in a clinical pediatric sample. Methods: Demographic and neuropsychological data for children with a billing diagnosis of ADHD were extracted from a clinical database. Families completed standard rating scales. Seventy-one patients with a co-morbid asthma diagnosis were identified and matched by age to a group of 71 patients with only ADHD. Results: Children with asthma and ADHD were more likely to display clinically elevated levels of hyperactivity, externalizing behaviors, anxiety, and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors compared to children with ADHD alone. Boys with asthma and ADHD had more symptoms than boys with only ADHD of somatization and emotional internalizing, while girls with asthma and ADHD had more symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity, conduct problems, anxiety, and emotional internalizing compared to girls with only ADHD. Conclusions: Findings suggest that in children with ADHD, co-morbid asthma is associated with increased behavioral and internalizing symptoms, with distinct gender differences present. Increased behavioral and internalizing symptoms seen in children with both asthma and ADHD may be due to the burden of their medical condition. No difference was found on cognitive variables, suggesting chronic hypoxia may be less influential in explaining these differences. Future research should determine the specific mechanisms of these differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Asthma
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 27 2017

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Asthma
Behavioral Symptoms
Impulsive Behavior
Anxiety
Anoxia
Demography
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • asthma
  • attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • emotional functioning
  • pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

The influence of comorbid asthma on the severity of symptoms in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. / Borschuk, Adrienne P.; Rodweller, Casey; Salorio, Cynthia F.

In: Journal of Asthma, 27.04.2017, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borschuk, Adrienne P.; Rodweller, Casey; Salorio, Cynthia F. / The influence of comorbid asthma on the severity of symptoms in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

In: Journal of Asthma, 27.04.2017, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8ed23c4ec5e8489782e633ee73d9206a,
title = "The influence of comorbid asthma on the severity of symptoms in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder",
abstract = "Objective: The current study examined the association between asthma and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in a clinical pediatric sample. Methods: Demographic and neuropsychological data for children with a billing diagnosis of ADHD were extracted from a clinical database. Families completed standard rating scales. Seventy-one patients with a co-morbid asthma diagnosis were identified and matched by age to a group of 71 patients with only ADHD. Results: Children with asthma and ADHD were more likely to display clinically elevated levels of hyperactivity, externalizing behaviors, anxiety, and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors compared to children with ADHD alone. Boys with asthma and ADHD had more symptoms than boys with only ADHD of somatization and emotional internalizing, while girls with asthma and ADHD had more symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity, conduct problems, anxiety, and emotional internalizing compared to girls with only ADHD. Conclusions: Findings suggest that in children with ADHD, co-morbid asthma is associated with increased behavioral and internalizing symptoms, with distinct gender differences present. Increased behavioral and internalizing symptoms seen in children with both asthma and ADHD may be due to the burden of their medical condition. No difference was found on cognitive variables, suggesting chronic hypoxia may be less influential in explaining these differences. Future research should determine the specific mechanisms of these differences.",
keywords = "ADHD, asthma, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, emotional functioning, pediatrics",
author = "Borschuk, {Adrienne P.} and Casey Rodweller and Salorio, {Cynthia F.}",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1080/02770903.2017.1306549",
pages = "1--7",
journal = "Journal of Asthma",
issn = "0277-0903",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of comorbid asthma on the severity of symptoms in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

AU - Borschuk,Adrienne P.

AU - Rodweller,Casey

AU - Salorio,Cynthia F.

PY - 2017/4/27

Y1 - 2017/4/27

N2 - Objective: The current study examined the association between asthma and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in a clinical pediatric sample. Methods: Demographic and neuropsychological data for children with a billing diagnosis of ADHD were extracted from a clinical database. Families completed standard rating scales. Seventy-one patients with a co-morbid asthma diagnosis were identified and matched by age to a group of 71 patients with only ADHD. Results: Children with asthma and ADHD were more likely to display clinically elevated levels of hyperactivity, externalizing behaviors, anxiety, and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors compared to children with ADHD alone. Boys with asthma and ADHD had more symptoms than boys with only ADHD of somatization and emotional internalizing, while girls with asthma and ADHD had more symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity, conduct problems, anxiety, and emotional internalizing compared to girls with only ADHD. Conclusions: Findings suggest that in children with ADHD, co-morbid asthma is associated with increased behavioral and internalizing symptoms, with distinct gender differences present. Increased behavioral and internalizing symptoms seen in children with both asthma and ADHD may be due to the burden of their medical condition. No difference was found on cognitive variables, suggesting chronic hypoxia may be less influential in explaining these differences. Future research should determine the specific mechanisms of these differences.

AB - Objective: The current study examined the association between asthma and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in a clinical pediatric sample. Methods: Demographic and neuropsychological data for children with a billing diagnosis of ADHD were extracted from a clinical database. Families completed standard rating scales. Seventy-one patients with a co-morbid asthma diagnosis were identified and matched by age to a group of 71 patients with only ADHD. Results: Children with asthma and ADHD were more likely to display clinically elevated levels of hyperactivity, externalizing behaviors, anxiety, and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors compared to children with ADHD alone. Boys with asthma and ADHD had more symptoms than boys with only ADHD of somatization and emotional internalizing, while girls with asthma and ADHD had more symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity, conduct problems, anxiety, and emotional internalizing compared to girls with only ADHD. Conclusions: Findings suggest that in children with ADHD, co-morbid asthma is associated with increased behavioral and internalizing symptoms, with distinct gender differences present. Increased behavioral and internalizing symptoms seen in children with both asthma and ADHD may be due to the burden of their medical condition. No difference was found on cognitive variables, suggesting chronic hypoxia may be less influential in explaining these differences. Future research should determine the specific mechanisms of these differences.

KW - ADHD

KW - asthma

KW - attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

KW - emotional functioning

KW - pediatrics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018388299&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018388299&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02770903.2017.1306549

DO - 10.1080/02770903.2017.1306549

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 7

JO - Journal of Asthma

T2 - Journal of Asthma

JF - Journal of Asthma

SN - 0277-0903

ER -