The induction of CD80 and apoptosis on B cells and CD40L in CD4+ T cells in response to seasonal influenza vaccination distinguishes responders versus non-responders in healthy controls and aviremic ART-treated HIV-infected individuals

Anna M. Powell, Zhenwu Luo, Lisa Martin, Zhuang Wan, Lei Ma, Guoyang Liao, Yuxia Song, Xiaochun Li, J. Michael Kilby, Lei Huang, Wei Jiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Studies have shown that HIV infection is associated with an impaired influenza vaccine response. We examined the role of cellular phenotypes and function in influenza vaccine responsiveness in healthy controls and aviremic HIV-infected subjects on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods 16 healthy controls and 26 ART+ aviremic HIV+ subjects were enrolled in the current study. Blood was collected at pre-vaccination (D0), and on days 7–10 (D7) and 14–21 (D14) following the 2013–2014 seasonal influenza vaccine administrations. Subjects were classified as responders if neutralizing titers against H1N1 virus increased ⩾4-fold at D14 compared to D0. A serial analysis of B and CD4+ T cell frequencies and activation was performed on D0 and D7 by flow cytometry. Results 9 of 26 (34.6%) HIV-infected individuals and 7 of 16 (43.8%) healthy controls were classified as responders to influenza vaccines. Total B cell apoptosis (annexin V) was increased on D7 post-vaccination in non-responders but not in responders among both controls and HIV+ subjects. Surface CD80 expression on memory B cells and intracellular CD40L expression on memory CD4+ T cells were induced on D7 in responders of controls but not in non-responders. The CD80 and CD40L induction was not demonstrable in HIV-infected subjects regardless of responders and non-responders. Memory CD4+ T cell cycling tended to increase on D7 in the four study groups but did not achieve significance. All the other parameters were indistinguishable between responders and non-responders, regardless of HIV-infection status. Conclusion The perturbation of activation and apoptotic induction on B cells or CD4+ T cells after seasonal influenza vaccination in non-responders and HIV-infected subjects may help understand the mechanism of impaired vaccine responsiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-841
Number of pages11
JournalVaccine
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Keywords

  • B cells
  • HIV disease
  • Immunologic responders and non-responders
  • Influenza vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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