The indoor environment and its effects on childhood asthma

Sharon K. Ahluwalia, Elizabeth C. Matsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose of Review: Indoor pollutants and allergens cause asthma symptoms and exacerbations and influence the risk of developing asthma. We review recent studies regarding the effects of the indoor environment on childhood asthma. Recent Findings: Exposure to some indoor allergens and second hand smoke are causally related to the development of asthma in children. Many recent studies have demonstrated an association between exposure to indoor pollutants and allergens and airways inflammation, asthma symptoms, and increased healthcare utilization among individuals with established asthma. Genetic polymorphisms conferring susceptibility to some indoor exposures have also been identified, and recent findings support the notion that environmental exposures may influence gene expression through epigenetic modification. Recent studies also support the efficacy of multifaceted environmental interventions in childhood asthma. Summary: Studies have provided significant evidence of the association between many indoor pollutants and allergens and asthma morbidity, and have also demonstrated the efficacy of multifaceted indoor environmental interventions in childhood asthma. There is also a growing body of evidence suggesting that some indoor pollutants and allergens may increase the risk of developing asthma. Future studies should examine mechanisms whereby environmental exposures may influence asthma pathogenesis and expand the current knowledge of susceptibility factors for indoor exposures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-143
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Asthma
Allergens
Environmental Exposure
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Genetic Polymorphisms
Epigenomics
Inflammation
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Gene Expression

Keywords

  • Childhood asthma
  • indoor allergens
  • indoor pollution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

The indoor environment and its effects on childhood asthma. / Ahluwalia, Sharon K.; Matsui, Elizabeth C.

In: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 11, No. 2, 04.2011, p. 137-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahluwalia, Sharon K. ; Matsui, Elizabeth C. / The indoor environment and its effects on childhood asthma. In: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 137-143.
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