The Importance of Determining Trainee Perspectives on Procedural Competencies During Spine Surgery Clinical Fellowship

Antony H. Bateman, Jeremie Larouche, Christina L. Goldstein, Daniel M. Sciubba, Theodore J. Choma, Brandon Lawrence, Joseph Cheng, Michael G. Fehlings, Scott J. Paquette, Albert J.M. Yee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Study Design: Longitudinal survey. Objective: It remains important to align competence-based objectives for training as deemed important by clinical fellows to those of their fellowship supervisors and program educators. The primary aim of this study was to determine trainee views on the relative importance of specific procedural training competencies. Secondarily, we aimed to evaluate self-perceived confidence in procedural performance at the commencement and completion of fellowship. Methods: Questionnaires were administered to 68 clinical fellows enrolled in the AOSNA fellowship program during the 2015-2016 academic year. A Likert-type scale was used to quantify trainee perspectives on the relative importance of specific procedural competencies to their training base on an established curriculum including 53 general and 22 focused/advanced procedural competencies. We measured trainee self-perceived confidence in performing procedures at the commencement and completion of their program. Statistical analysis was performed on fellow demographic data and procedural responses. Results: Our initial survey response rate was 82% (56/68) and 69% (47/68) for the follow-up survey. Although most procedural competencies were regarded of high importance, we did identify several procedures of high importance yet low confidence among fellows (ie, upper cervical, thoracic discectomy surgery), which highlights an educational opportunity. Overall procedural confidence increased from an average Likert score of 4.2 (SD = 1.3) on the initial survey to 5.4 (SD = 0.8) by follow-up survey (P <.0001). Conclusions: Understanding trainee goals for clinical fellowship remains important. Identification of areas of low procedural confidence and high importance to training experience will better guide fellowship programs and supervisors in the strategic delivery of the educational experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-24
Number of pages7
JournalGlobal Spine Journal
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Keywords

  • clinical fellowship
  • competencies
  • curriculum
  • education
  • spine surgery
  • syllabus
  • trainee

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

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