The impact of rainfall and temperature on the spatial progression of cases during the chikungunya re-emergence in Thailand in 2008-2009

Sudarat Chadsuthi, Sopon Iamsirithaworn, Wannapong Triampo, Derek A T Cummings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: In 2008, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) re-emerged in Thailand aftermore than a decade of absence. Cases first appeared in the extreme southern region of the country and advanced northward approx. 300 kmover the next 18 months. The spatial advance of CHIKV cases appeared to occur at two rates, initially progressing slowly and then increasing in speed. We hypothesize that climatic variation affected the transmission of CHIKV in the country. Methods: To determine the effect of climate on CHIKV transmission, we evaluatedmodelswhere climate affects the transmission rate from mosquitoes to humans; extrinsic incubation period; fertility rate ofmosquitoes; and the mortality rate of mosquito larvae. We compared these models to models that did not include climate effects. Results: The inclusion of climate data greatly improvedmodel fit withmodels assuming climate affected the fertility rate of mosquitoes providing the best fit to data. Conclusion: These results suggest that climatic variation contributed to the slower rate of incidence observed inMarch 2009. Overall, a gradient in transmission probability and mortality and fertility rates of mosquito is observed over the entire area with the most southern districts experiencing the most efficient transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbertrv114
Pages (from-to)125-133
Number of pages9
JournalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume110
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 4 2016

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Chikungunya virus
Thailand
Climate
Culicidae
Birth Rate
Temperature
Mortality
Larva
Incidence

Keywords

  • Chikungunya
  • Emergence
  • Spatial
  • Thailand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The impact of rainfall and temperature on the spatial progression of cases during the chikungunya re-emergence in Thailand in 2008-2009. / Chadsuthi, Sudarat; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Triampo, Wannapong; Cummings, Derek A T.

In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 110, No. 2, trv114, 04.01.2016, p. 125-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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