The impact of race and insurance type on the outcome of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair

Anthony Lemaire, Chad Cook, Sean Tackett, Donna M. Mendes, Cynthia K. Shortell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Although mortality and complication rates for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have declined over the last 20 years, operative complication rates and perioperative mortality are still high, specifically for repair of ruptures. The goal of this study was to determine the influence of insurance type and ethnicity while controlling for the influences of potential confounders on procedure selection and outcome following endovascular AAA repair (EVAR). Methods: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, we identified patients who underwent EVAR repair of ruptured and elective infrarenal AAA, between 1990 and 2003. Insurance type and ethnicity were analyzed against the primary outcome variables of mortality and major complications. The potential confounders of age, gender, operative location, diabetes, and Deyo index of comorbidities, were controlled. Results: Bivariate analyses demonstrated significant differences between insurance types and ethnicity and mortality and complications. Patients who were self pay had adverse outcomes in comparison to Private insurance. Whites encountered less perioperative mortality and postoperative complications than Blacks and Hispanics. Conclusions: After controlling for previously identified associative factors for AAA outcome, ethnicity and insurance type does influence EVAR surgical outcome. Subsequent studies that break down emergent repair vs elective surgery and that longitudinally stratify delay in surgery, or time to admission may be useful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1172-1180
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Insurance
Mortality
Hispanic Americans
Comorbidity
Inpatients
Rupture
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

The impact of race and insurance type on the outcome of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. / Lemaire, Anthony; Cook, Chad; Tackett, Sean; Mendes, Donna M.; Shortell, Cynthia K.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 47, No. 6, 06.2008, p. 1172-1180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lemaire, Anthony ; Cook, Chad ; Tackett, Sean ; Mendes, Donna M. ; Shortell, Cynthia K. / The impact of race and insurance type on the outcome of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 47, No. 6. pp. 1172-1180.
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