The impact of illicit drug use and substance abuse treatment on adherence to HAART

P. L. Hicks, K. P. Mulvey, Geetanjali Chander, J. A. Fleishman, J. S. Josephs, P. T. Korthuis, J. Hellinger, P. Gaist, Kelly Gebo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

High levels of adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are essential for virologic suppression and longer survival in patients with HIV. We examined the effects of substance abuse treatment, current versus former substance use, and hazardous/binge drinking on adherence to HAART. During 2003, 659 HIV patients on HAART in primary care were interviewed. Adherence was defined as ≥95% adherence to all antiretroviral medications. Current substance users used illicit drugs and/or hazardous/binge drinking within the past six months, while former users had not used substances for at least six months. Logistic regression analyses of adherence to HAART included demographic, clinical and substance abuse variables. Sixty-seven percent of the sample reported 95% adherence or greater. However, current users (60%) were significantly less likely to be adherent than former (68%) or never users (77%). In multivariate analysis, former users in substance abuse treatment were as adherent to HAART as never users (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=0.82; p>0.5). In contrast, former users who had not received recent substance abuse treatment were significantly less adherent than never users (AOR=0.61; p=0.05). Current substance users were significantly less adherent than never users, regardless of substance abuse treatment (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1134-1140
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

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Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Street Drugs
substance abuse
Substance-Related Disorders
drug use
Binge Drinking
Odds Ratio
HIV
Therapeutics
Hazardous Substances
Primary Health Care
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography
Survival
suppression
multivariate analysis
medication
logistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The impact of illicit drug use and substance abuse treatment on adherence to HAART. / Hicks, P. L.; Mulvey, K. P.; Chander, Geetanjali; Fleishman, J. A.; Josephs, J. S.; Korthuis, P. T.; Hellinger, J.; Gaist, P.; Gebo, Kelly.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 19, No. 9, 10.2007, p. 1134-1140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hicks, P. L. ; Mulvey, K. P. ; Chander, Geetanjali ; Fleishman, J. A. ; Josephs, J. S. ; Korthuis, P. T. ; Hellinger, J. ; Gaist, P. ; Gebo, Kelly. / The impact of illicit drug use and substance abuse treatment on adherence to HAART. In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV. 2007 ; Vol. 19, No. 9. pp. 1134-1140.
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