The immunogenicity of Haemophilus influenza type b conjugate vaccines in children born to human immunodeficiency virus-infected women

Jennifer S. Read, Carl E. Frasch, Kenneth Rich, Gordon A. Fitzgerald, John D. Clemens, Jane Pitt, Stephen I. Pelton, I. Celine Hanson, Edward Handelsman, Clemente Diaz, Mary Glenn Fowler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. Immunocompromise caused by HIV-1 infection increases the importance of receipt of routine childhood vaccines to prevent infections such as invasive Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) disease. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the immunogenicity of Hib conjugate vaccines among HIV-infected children according to clinical and immunologic disease progression as well as viral load. Methods. The concentration of antibody to polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) was measured at ~9 and 24 months of age in plasma specimens from children of HIV-infected women enrolled in the Women and Infants Transmission Study. Results. Among 227 children (35 HIV-infected, 192 uninfected) at the 9-month study visit who were known to have received age-appropriate immunization with CRM197 mutant Corynebacterium diphtheriae protein-conjugated Hib vaccine, geometric mean antibody concentrations were lower among HIV-infected children (1.64 μg/ml) than among uninfected children (2.70 μg/ml), although the difference was not statistically significant. Anti-PRP antibody concentrations did not vary significantly among these HIV-infected children with predominantly mild- moderate disease progression according to clinical category, immunologic stage or viral load (P ≤ 0.48). The proportion of children with antibody concentrations ≤1.0 μg/ml did not vary significantly according to HIV infection status (73% uninfected, 74% infected) or, if infected, clinical or immunologic disease progression or viral load. Similar results were obtained among 127 children (17 HIV-infected, 110 uninfected) eligible for analysis at the 24-month study visit. Changes in antibody concentrations over time (between 9 and 24 months of age) did not differ significantly among 10 HIV- infected as compared with 72 uninfected children (P = 0.81). Conclusions. These results suggest that HIV-infected children with predominantly mild- moderate disease progression respond reasonably well in terms of a quantitative antibody response to Hib conjugate vaccines during the first 2 years of life. Research to further characterize the immune response to Hib conjugate vaccines and to further delineate the 'durability' of anti-PRP antibody concentrations beyond 2 years of life should be pursued.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-397
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related opportunistic infections
  • Bacterial antibodies
  • Haemophilus vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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