The Health Record Banking imperative: A conceptual model

Jonathan D. Gold, Marion J. Ball

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

No unified, functioning system currently exists for the exchange of comprehensive health-care information across the wide spectrum of health-care networks. Regional health information organizations (RHIOs) and a national health information network (NHIN) have been proposed as vital building blocks in providing such a system, but these face many challenges, including delineation and implementation of accepted standards for health-care data, accurate patient identification and record matching, and the definition of incentives for accelerated deployment of health information technology. In response to these challenges, we present in this paper an alternative option, the Health Record Banking (HRB) system. Emulating commercial banking, this approach uses health-record banks to serve the need for immediately accessible and secure data for diverse stakeholders. It provides a means for financial independence for these banks and a mechanism for fostering medical research. We conclude with 10 critical issues associated with the development and implementation of an HRB system, which require public discussion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-55
Number of pages13
JournalIBM Systems Journal
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Banking
Conceptual Model
Health
Health care
Healthcare
Incentives
Information Technology
Building Blocks
Information technology
Immediately
Alternatives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software
  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

The Health Record Banking imperative : A conceptual model. / Gold, Jonathan D.; Ball, Marion J.

In: IBM Systems Journal, Vol. 46, No. 1, 2007, p. 43-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8818649526c34b75977ddf3b2a995647,
title = "The Health Record Banking imperative: A conceptual model",
abstract = "No unified, functioning system currently exists for the exchange of comprehensive health-care information across the wide spectrum of health-care networks. Regional health information organizations (RHIOs) and a national health information network (NHIN) have been proposed as vital building blocks in providing such a system, but these face many challenges, including delineation and implementation of accepted standards for health-care data, accurate patient identification and record matching, and the definition of incentives for accelerated deployment of health information technology. In response to these challenges, we present in this paper an alternative option, the Health Record Banking (HRB) system. Emulating commercial banking, this approach uses health-record banks to serve the need for immediately accessible and secure data for diverse stakeholders. It provides a means for financial independence for these banks and a mechanism for fostering medical research. We conclude with 10 critical issues associated with the development and implementation of an HRB system, which require public discussion.",
author = "Gold, {Jonathan D.} and Ball, {Marion J.}",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1147/sj.461.0043",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "46",
pages = "43--55",
journal = "IBM Systems Journal",
issn = "0018-8670",
publisher = "IBM Corporation",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Health Record Banking imperative

T2 - A conceptual model

AU - Gold, Jonathan D.

AU - Ball, Marion J.

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - No unified, functioning system currently exists for the exchange of comprehensive health-care information across the wide spectrum of health-care networks. Regional health information organizations (RHIOs) and a national health information network (NHIN) have been proposed as vital building blocks in providing such a system, but these face many challenges, including delineation and implementation of accepted standards for health-care data, accurate patient identification and record matching, and the definition of incentives for accelerated deployment of health information technology. In response to these challenges, we present in this paper an alternative option, the Health Record Banking (HRB) system. Emulating commercial banking, this approach uses health-record banks to serve the need for immediately accessible and secure data for diverse stakeholders. It provides a means for financial independence for these banks and a mechanism for fostering medical research. We conclude with 10 critical issues associated with the development and implementation of an HRB system, which require public discussion.

AB - No unified, functioning system currently exists for the exchange of comprehensive health-care information across the wide spectrum of health-care networks. Regional health information organizations (RHIOs) and a national health information network (NHIN) have been proposed as vital building blocks in providing such a system, but these face many challenges, including delineation and implementation of accepted standards for health-care data, accurate patient identification and record matching, and the definition of incentives for accelerated deployment of health information technology. In response to these challenges, we present in this paper an alternative option, the Health Record Banking (HRB) system. Emulating commercial banking, this approach uses health-record banks to serve the need for immediately accessible and secure data for diverse stakeholders. It provides a means for financial independence for these banks and a mechanism for fostering medical research. We conclude with 10 critical issues associated with the development and implementation of an HRB system, which require public discussion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33947121201&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33947121201&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1147/sj.461.0043

DO - 10.1147/sj.461.0043

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33947121201

VL - 46

SP - 43

EP - 55

JO - IBM Systems Journal

JF - IBM Systems Journal

SN - 0018-8670

IS - 1

ER -