The genomic and molecular pathology of prostate cancer: Clinical implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy

Farzana A. Faisal, Tamara Lotan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous malignancy affecting American men and the second most common cause of cancer death. The traditional risk classification schemes for PCa are limited due to the vast clinical and molecular heterogeneity of the disease. Fortunately, recent advancements in sequencing technologies have provided us with valuable insight into the genomics of PCa. To date, a wide array of recurrent genomic alterations in PCa have been identified. Incorporating these distinct molecular subtypes of PCa into prediction models provides opportunities for improved risk stratification and ultimately better patient outcomes. In this review, we summarize the key molecular subtypes of PCa and focus on those genomic alterations that have clinical implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAdvances in anatomic pathology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Molecular Pathology
Prostatic Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Genomics
Cause of Death
Neoplasms
Technology

Keywords

  • genomics
  • molecular pathology
  • prostate cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

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