The FMR1 and FMR2 Mutations Are Not Common Etiologies of Academic Difficulty among School-Age Children

Michele M Mazzocco, Nancy Lee Sonna, James T. Teisl, Arvoranee Pinit, Bruce K. Shapiro, Nandita Shah, Allan L. Reiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The prevalence of the fragile X mental retardation (FMR) 1 and FMR2 full mutations (fM) was examined among 1014 school-age children with academic difficulties but without mental retardation. Both Southern blot and polymerase chain reaction analyses for FMR1 and FMR2 were performed on samples obtained from these children. No fM genes were found, and one FMR1 premutation was identified. The distribution of allele sizes for both genes was comparable to those reported for other clinical and normal population samples. These results suggest that neither the FMR1 nor the FMR2 mutation is a common etiology of academic failure among school-age children without mental retardation and that the prevalence of the FMR1 premutation is no more frequent in children with academic failure than it is in the general population. J Dev Behav Pediatr 18:392-398, 1997.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)392-398
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1997
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Fragile X
  • Fragile X E
  • Prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The FMR1 and FMR2 Mutations Are Not Common Etiologies of Academic Difficulty among School-Age Children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this