The failure of furosemide-induced salt and water loss to convert benign to malignant hypertension in the rat

S. K. Wilson, K. Solez, R. H. Heptinstall

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Abstract

The concept has been advanced that malignant hypertension is precipitated in the rat with renal hypertension by a sudden loss of sodium in the urine. In order to test this hypothesis modest degrees of hypertension were produced in Holtzman rats by the application of a silver clip to one renal artery, not touching the opposite kidney. When the systolic blood pressure reached a level between 160 and 180 mm Hg, loss of sodium and water was induced by the administration of furosemide, given either orally over a 7-day period, or by 3 intramuscular injections over a 24-hour period. Sodium and water balance studies, blood pressure determinations, histologic assessment of blood vessels in the non-clipped kidney, and measurement of activity of the juxtaglomerular apparatus were carried out in these 2 groups and appropriate control animals. It was found that in spite of a considerable natriuresis and diuresis in furosemide-treated animals, there was neither a significant increase in blood pressure nor development of more severe vascular lesions in the nonclipped kidney than in the kidneys of control animals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-318
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume101
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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