The evolution of the globin family genes: Concordance of stochastic and augmented maximum parsimony genetic distances for α hemoglobin, β hemoglobin and myoglobin phylogenies

Richard Holmquist, Thomas H. Jukes, Herbert Moise, Morris Goodman, G. William Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We compare the amino acid sequences of 70 globing, representing the following families: (a) α hemoglobin chains; (b) β hemoglobin chains; (c) myoglobins; (d) two lamprey, a mollusc, and two plant globins. The comparisons show a convergence of maximal and minimal estimates of genetic differences as calculated respectively by the stochastic and maximum parsimony procedures, thus demonstrating for the first time the logical consistency and complementarity of the two procedures. Evolutionary rates are non-constant, varying over a range of 1 to 75 nucleotide replacements per 100 codons per 108 years. These rate differentials are resolved into two components (a) due to change in the number of codon sites free to fix mutations during the period of divergence of the species involved; (b) due to change in fixation intensity at each site. These two components also show non-uniformity along different lineages. Positive Darwinian natural selection can bring about an increase in either component, and negative or stabilizing selection in protein evolution can lead to decreases. Accelerated rates of globin evolution were found in lineages of cold-blooded vertebrates, some marsupials, and early placental mammals, while slower rates were found in warm-blooded vertebrates, especially higher primates. One manifestation of negative selection in the globins is that minimal 3-base type amino acid replacements occur less frequently than would be expected if base replacements had occurred and were accepted at random. The selection against these replacements is not due to atypical behavior with respect to the change in electrical charge involved in the replacements. Interestingly, the globins from the lamprey, sea hare and the legumes are as distant from one another as are α-hemoglobin and β-hemoglobin from myoglobin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-74
Number of pages36
JournalJournal of Molecular Biology
Volume105
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 25 1976
Externally publishedYes

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Globins
Myoglobin
Phylogeny
Hemoglobins
Codon
Genes
Vertebrates
Petromyzon
Lampreys
Hares
Marsupialia
Mollusca
Genetic Selection
Fabaceae
Primates
Mammals
Amino Acid Sequence
Nucleotides
Amino Acids
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

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The evolution of the globin family genes : Concordance of stochastic and augmented maximum parsimony genetic distances for α hemoglobin, β hemoglobin and myoglobin phylogenies. / Holmquist, Richard; Jukes, Thomas H.; Moise, Herbert; Goodman, Morris; Moore, G. William.

In: Journal of Molecular Biology, Vol. 105, No. 1, 25.07.1976, p. 39-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Holmquist, Richard ; Jukes, Thomas H. ; Moise, Herbert ; Goodman, Morris ; Moore, G. William. / The evolution of the globin family genes : Concordance of stochastic and augmented maximum parsimony genetic distances for α hemoglobin, β hemoglobin and myoglobin phylogenies. In: Journal of Molecular Biology. 1976 ; Vol. 105, No. 1. pp. 39-74.
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