The Epidemiology of Social Isolation: National Health and Aging Trends Study

Thomas K.M. Cudjoe, David L. Roth, Sarah L. Szanton, Jennifer L. Wolff, Cynthia M. Boyd, Roland J. Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Social isolation among older adults is an important but under-recognized risk for poor health outcomes. Methods are needed to identify subgroups of older adults at risk for social isolation. METHODS: We constructed a typology of social isolation using data from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) and estimated the prevalence and correlates of social isolation among community-dwelling older adults. The typology was formed from four domains: living arrangement, core discussion network size, religious attendance, and social participation. RESULTS: In 2011, 24% of self-responding, community-dwelling older adults (65+ years), approximately 7.7 million people, were characterized as socially isolated, including 1.3 million (4%) who were characterized as severely socially isolated. Multinomial multivariable logistic regression indicated that being unmarried, male, having low education, and low income were all independently associated with social isolation. Black and Hispanic older adults had lower odds of social isolation compared with white older adults, after adjusting for covariates. DISCUSSION: Social isolation is an important and potentially modifiable risk that affects a significant proportion of the older adult population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-113
Number of pages7
JournalThe journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
Volume75
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Fingerprint

Social Isolation
epidemiology
social isolation
Epidemiology
Health
trend
health
Independent Living
typology
Social Participation
social participation
life situation
Hispanic Americans
community
low income
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
logistics
Education
regression

Keywords

  • Living arrangement
  • Participation
  • Social isolation
  • Social networks
  • Social relationships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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title = "The Epidemiology of Social Isolation: National Health and Aging Trends Study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Social isolation among older adults is an important but under-recognized risk for poor health outcomes. Methods are needed to identify subgroups of older adults at risk for social isolation. METHODS: We constructed a typology of social isolation using data from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) and estimated the prevalence and correlates of social isolation among community-dwelling older adults. The typology was formed from four domains: living arrangement, core discussion network size, religious attendance, and social participation. RESULTS: In 2011, 24{\%} of self-responding, community-dwelling older adults (65+ years), approximately 7.7 million people, were characterized as socially isolated, including 1.3 million (4{\%}) who were characterized as severely socially isolated. Multinomial multivariable logistic regression indicated that being unmarried, male, having low education, and low income were all independently associated with social isolation. Black and Hispanic older adults had lower odds of social isolation compared with white older adults, after adjusting for covariates. DISCUSSION: Social isolation is an important and potentially modifiable risk that affects a significant proportion of the older adult population.",
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AU - Boyd, Cynthia M.

AU - Thorpe, Roland J.

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