The enkephalinase inhibitor, GB 52, does not affect nociceptive flexion reflexes nor pain sensation in humans

J. C. Willer, Agnes Roby, Monique Ernst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The effects of intravenous administration of 2.5 mg/kg of GB 52, a highly potent derivative of the enkcphalinase inhibitor, thiorphan, were studied on the threshold of both the nociceptive reflex (Tr) and sensation of pain (Tp) as well as on the thresholds of both recruitment of the maximal nociceptive reflex response (Tmr) and tolerable pain (Tip), elicited by electrical stimulation of the sural nerve in normal and relaxed volunteers. It was found that neither the nociceptive motor responses (Tr and Tmr) nor the subjective reports of pain (Tp and Tip), were significantly affected by GB 52. It is concluded that, in the experimental conditions used, the transmission of nociceptive messages at the spinal level is not tonically modulated by any enkephalinergic system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-822
Number of pages4
JournalNeuropharmacology
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1986

Keywords

  • endogenous opiates
  • enkephalinase
  • enkephalinase inhibitor
  • humans
  • nociceptive flexion reflexes
  • pain sensations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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