The effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and scopolamine in Alzheimer's disease and normal volunteers

S. E. Molchan, A. M. Mellow, J. L. Hill, H. Weingartner, R. Martinez, B. Vitiello, T. Sunderland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), a neuromodulator and possibly a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, was shown in a prior study of young normal volunteers to attenuate the memory impairment induced by the anticholinergic drug scopolamine. In the present study, the cognitive, behavioral and physiologic effects of high dose TRH (0.5mg/kg), both alone and following administration of scopolamine, were examined in 10 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients (mean age±SD=63.5 years) and 12 older normal volunteers (mean age=64.9±8.8 years). On the day AD subjects received TRH alone, modest but statistically significant improvement from baseline performance was documented on some tests of learning and memory, especially in those with mild dementia severity. In comparing cognitive test performance between the scopolamine alone and scopolamine+TRH conditions, only two test scores were significantly higher in the latter condition. In the group of older volunteers, TRH did not attenuate scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, contrary to prior findings in a group of younger controls. In fact, older subjects performed worse after receiving scopolamine followed by TRH than after receiving scopolamine alone. In addition, no change from baseline cognitive performance was detected after subjects received TRH alone. These findings raise several questions and speculations on possible age-related changes in the cholinergic system, as well as on the mechanism of the interaction of TRH with the cholinergic system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-500
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Psychopharmacology
Volume6
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Scopolamine Hydrobromide
Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone
Healthy Volunteers
Alzheimer Disease
Cholinergic Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Cholinergic Antagonists
Dementia
Volunteers
Central Nervous System
Learning
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Molchan, S. E., Mellow, A. M., Hill, J. L., Weingartner, H., Martinez, R., Vitiello, B., & Sunderland, T. (1992). The effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and scopolamine in Alzheimer's disease and normal volunteers. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 6(4), 489-500.

The effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and scopolamine in Alzheimer's disease and normal volunteers. / Molchan, S. E.; Mellow, A. M.; Hill, J. L.; Weingartner, H.; Martinez, R.; Vitiello, B.; Sunderland, T.

In: Journal of Psychopharmacology, Vol. 6, No. 4, 1992, p. 489-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Molchan, SE, Mellow, AM, Hill, JL, Weingartner, H, Martinez, R, Vitiello, B & Sunderland, T 1992, 'The effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and scopolamine in Alzheimer's disease and normal volunteers', Journal of Psychopharmacology, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 489-500.
Molchan SE, Mellow AM, Hill JL, Weingartner H, Martinez R, Vitiello B et al. The effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and scopolamine in Alzheimer's disease and normal volunteers. Journal of Psychopharmacology. 1992;6(4):489-500.
Molchan, S. E. ; Mellow, A. M. ; Hill, J. L. ; Weingartner, H. ; Martinez, R. ; Vitiello, B. ; Sunderland, T. / The effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and scopolamine in Alzheimer's disease and normal volunteers. In: Journal of Psychopharmacology. 1992 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 489-500.
@article{1c2268ab94884e53b6ac9b4f932a6dd7,
title = "The effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and scopolamine in Alzheimer's disease and normal volunteers",
abstract = "Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), a neuromodulator and possibly a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, was shown in a prior study of young normal volunteers to attenuate the memory impairment induced by the anticholinergic drug scopolamine. In the present study, the cognitive, behavioral and physiologic effects of high dose TRH (0.5mg/kg), both alone and following administration of scopolamine, were examined in 10 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients (mean age±SD=63.5 years) and 12 older normal volunteers (mean age=64.9±8.8 years). On the day AD subjects received TRH alone, modest but statistically significant improvement from baseline performance was documented on some tests of learning and memory, especially in those with mild dementia severity. In comparing cognitive test performance between the scopolamine alone and scopolamine+TRH conditions, only two test scores were significantly higher in the latter condition. In the group of older volunteers, TRH did not attenuate scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, contrary to prior findings in a group of younger controls. In fact, older subjects performed worse after receiving scopolamine followed by TRH than after receiving scopolamine alone. In addition, no change from baseline cognitive performance was detected after subjects received TRH alone. These findings raise several questions and speculations on possible age-related changes in the cholinergic system, as well as on the mechanism of the interaction of TRH with the cholinergic system.",
author = "Molchan, {S. E.} and Mellow, {A. M.} and Hill, {J. L.} and H. Weingartner and R. Martinez and B. Vitiello and T. Sunderland",
year = "1992",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "489--500",
journal = "Journal of Psychopharmacology",
issn = "0269-8811",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and scopolamine in Alzheimer's disease and normal volunteers

AU - Molchan, S. E.

AU - Mellow, A. M.

AU - Hill, J. L.

AU - Weingartner, H.

AU - Martinez, R.

AU - Vitiello, B.

AU - Sunderland, T.

PY - 1992

Y1 - 1992

N2 - Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), a neuromodulator and possibly a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, was shown in a prior study of young normal volunteers to attenuate the memory impairment induced by the anticholinergic drug scopolamine. In the present study, the cognitive, behavioral and physiologic effects of high dose TRH (0.5mg/kg), both alone and following administration of scopolamine, were examined in 10 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients (mean age±SD=63.5 years) and 12 older normal volunteers (mean age=64.9±8.8 years). On the day AD subjects received TRH alone, modest but statistically significant improvement from baseline performance was documented on some tests of learning and memory, especially in those with mild dementia severity. In comparing cognitive test performance between the scopolamine alone and scopolamine+TRH conditions, only two test scores were significantly higher in the latter condition. In the group of older volunteers, TRH did not attenuate scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, contrary to prior findings in a group of younger controls. In fact, older subjects performed worse after receiving scopolamine followed by TRH than after receiving scopolamine alone. In addition, no change from baseline cognitive performance was detected after subjects received TRH alone. These findings raise several questions and speculations on possible age-related changes in the cholinergic system, as well as on the mechanism of the interaction of TRH with the cholinergic system.

AB - Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), a neuromodulator and possibly a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, was shown in a prior study of young normal volunteers to attenuate the memory impairment induced by the anticholinergic drug scopolamine. In the present study, the cognitive, behavioral and physiologic effects of high dose TRH (0.5mg/kg), both alone and following administration of scopolamine, were examined in 10 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients (mean age±SD=63.5 years) and 12 older normal volunteers (mean age=64.9±8.8 years). On the day AD subjects received TRH alone, modest but statistically significant improvement from baseline performance was documented on some tests of learning and memory, especially in those with mild dementia severity. In comparing cognitive test performance between the scopolamine alone and scopolamine+TRH conditions, only two test scores were significantly higher in the latter condition. In the group of older volunteers, TRH did not attenuate scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, contrary to prior findings in a group of younger controls. In fact, older subjects performed worse after receiving scopolamine followed by TRH than after receiving scopolamine alone. In addition, no change from baseline cognitive performance was detected after subjects received TRH alone. These findings raise several questions and speculations on possible age-related changes in the cholinergic system, as well as on the mechanism of the interaction of TRH with the cholinergic system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027081623&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027081623&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0027081623

VL - 6

SP - 489

EP - 500

JO - Journal of Psychopharmacology

JF - Journal of Psychopharmacology

SN - 0269-8811

IS - 4

ER -