The effects of the nasal antihistamines olopatadine and azelastine in nasal allergen provocation

Patrik Pipkorn, Candy Costantini, Curt Reynolds, Michael Wall, Margaret Drake, Alvin Sanico, David Proud, Alkis Togias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Olopatadine, an antihistamine used in allergic conjunctivitis, is under development as a nasal preparation for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of olopatadine in suppressing symptoms and biomarkers of the immediate reaction induced by nasal allergen provocation and to compare olopatadine with azelastine in the same model. Methods: The study was approved by the Johns Hopkins University institutional review board, and all subjects gave written consent. We studied 20 asymptomatic subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis. The study had 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover phases that evaluated 2 concentrations of olopatadine, 0.1% and 0.2%. In a third exploratory phase, olopatadine, 0.1%, was compared with topical azelastine, 0.1%, in a patient-masked design. Efficacy variables were the allergen-induced sneezes, other clinical symptoms, and the levels of histamine, tryptase, albumin, lysozyme, and cysteinyl-leukotrienes (third study only) in nasal lavage fluids. Results: Both concentrations of olopatadine produced significant inhibition of all nasal symptoms, compared with placebo. Olopatadine, 0.1%, inhibited lysozyme levels, but olopatadine, 0.2%, inhibited histamine, albumin, and lysozyme. The effects of olopatadine, 0.1%, were comparable to those of azelastine, 0.1%. Conclusions: Olopatadine, at 0.1% and 0.2% concentrations, was effective in suppressing allergen-induced nasal symptoms. At 0.2%, olopatadine provided evidence suggestive of inhibition of mast cell degranulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-89
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume101
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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azelastine
Histamine Antagonists
Nose
Allergens
Muramidase
Histamine
Albumins
Olopatadine Hydrochloride
Nasal Lavage Fluid
Placebos
Allergic Conjunctivitis
Cell Degranulation
Tryptases
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Pipkorn, P., Costantini, C., Reynolds, C., Wall, M., Drake, M., Sanico, A., ... Togias, A. (2008). The effects of the nasal antihistamines olopatadine and azelastine in nasal allergen provocation. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, 101(1), 82-89.

The effects of the nasal antihistamines olopatadine and azelastine in nasal allergen provocation. / Pipkorn, Patrik; Costantini, Candy; Reynolds, Curt; Wall, Michael; Drake, Margaret; Sanico, Alvin; Proud, David; Togias, Alkis.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 101, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 82-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pipkorn, P, Costantini, C, Reynolds, C, Wall, M, Drake, M, Sanico, A, Proud, D & Togias, A 2008, 'The effects of the nasal antihistamines olopatadine and azelastine in nasal allergen provocation', Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, vol. 101, no. 1, pp. 82-89.
Pipkorn P, Costantini C, Reynolds C, Wall M, Drake M, Sanico A et al. The effects of the nasal antihistamines olopatadine and azelastine in nasal allergen provocation. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2008 Jul;101(1):82-89.
Pipkorn, Patrik ; Costantini, Candy ; Reynolds, Curt ; Wall, Michael ; Drake, Margaret ; Sanico, Alvin ; Proud, David ; Togias, Alkis. / The effects of the nasal antihistamines olopatadine and azelastine in nasal allergen provocation. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2008 ; Vol. 101, No. 1. pp. 82-89.
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abstract = "Background: Olopatadine, an antihistamine used in allergic conjunctivitis, is under development as a nasal preparation for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of olopatadine in suppressing symptoms and biomarkers of the immediate reaction induced by nasal allergen provocation and to compare olopatadine with azelastine in the same model. Methods: The study was approved by the Johns Hopkins University institutional review board, and all subjects gave written consent. We studied 20 asymptomatic subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis. The study had 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover phases that evaluated 2 concentrations of olopatadine, 0.1{\%} and 0.2{\%}. In a third exploratory phase, olopatadine, 0.1{\%}, was compared with topical azelastine, 0.1{\%}, in a patient-masked design. Efficacy variables were the allergen-induced sneezes, other clinical symptoms, and the levels of histamine, tryptase, albumin, lysozyme, and cysteinyl-leukotrienes (third study only) in nasal lavage fluids. Results: Both concentrations of olopatadine produced significant inhibition of all nasal symptoms, compared with placebo. Olopatadine, 0.1{\%}, inhibited lysozyme levels, but olopatadine, 0.2{\%}, inhibited histamine, albumin, and lysozyme. The effects of olopatadine, 0.1{\%}, were comparable to those of azelastine, 0.1{\%}. Conclusions: Olopatadine, at 0.1{\%} and 0.2{\%} concentrations, was effective in suppressing allergen-induced nasal symptoms. At 0.2{\%}, olopatadine provided evidence suggestive of inhibition of mast cell degranulation.",
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