THE EFFECTS OF SELF‐MONITORING AND SUPERVISOR FEEDBACK ON STAFF PERFORMANCE IN A RESIDENTIAL SETTING

Gina S. Richman, Mary R. Riordan, Maxin L. Reiss, David A.M. Pyles, Jon S. Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We evaluated the effects of a self‐monitoring procedure to increase staff on‐task behavior and adherence to scheduled activities. Self‐monitoring involved the use of activity cards that staff members completed and carried with them to assist in determining the activities for which they were responsible at any given time. Increases in both on‐schedule and on‐task behavior resulted. Supervisor feedback was subsequently added because some staff members did not maintain consistently high levels of performance. Generalization data indicated that staff members implemented the procedure during evening hours without specific programming. The advantages and limitations of using a self‐monitoring procedure for improving performance of staff members in residential settings are discussed. 1988 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-409
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988

Keywords

  • developmental disabilities
  • self‐management
  • self‐monitoring
  • staff
  • supervisory feedback systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Philosophy

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