The effects of race and age on axillary lymph node involvement in breast cancer patients at a Midwestern safety-net hospital

Robert J. Kenney, Jacob M. Marszalek, Megan E. McNally, Brook V. Nelson, Amin S. Herati, Glenn E. Talboy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Black and premenopausal patients have been shown to have poorer stage for stage survival than the overall population. The purpose of this study was to define the effects of age and race on axillary lymph node involvement at a Midwestern safety-net hospital. The hypothesis was that black patients under the age of 50 would be found to have increased rates of axillary involvement in breast cancer. Methods: A retrospective case review was performed of 184 breast cancer patients from 2000 to 2005. Statistical analysis was performed by race and age. Patients under 50 years of age were defined as premenopausal. Results: The overall rate of axillary involvement was 47.8%. Black patients had an overall rate of axillary involvement of 52.9%. However, premenopausal black patients had a 70.8% rate of axillary involvement (P < .05). Premenopausal white patients had a 46.3% rate of axillary involvement. Logistic regression analysis was performed, and premenopausal age and tumor size were found to be independent predictors of positive lymph node status in black patients. Conclusion: In our study, premenopausal black patients had a much higher rate of axillary lymph node involvement than any other group. This finding was consistent even when tumor size was taken into account. More research needs to be done to better define this difference and to detect this disease at an earlier stage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-69
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
Volume196
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Axillary lymph node
  • Black
  • Breast cancer
  • Premenopausal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of race and age on axillary lymph node involvement in breast cancer patients at a Midwestern safety-net hospital'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this