The effects of protocolized use of recombinant factor VIIa within a massive transfusion protocol in a civilian level I trauma center

Bryan C. Morse, Christopher J. Dente, Erica I. Hodgman, Beth H. Shaz, Jeffrey M. Nicholas, Amy D. Wyrzykowski, Jeffrey P. Salomone, Gary A. Vercruysse, Grace S. Rozycki, David V. Feliciano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite conflicting data regarding its effectiveness, many massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) include recombinant Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) as an adjunct to hemorrhage control. Over a 3-year period, outcome data for massively transfused patients was compared based on administration of rFVIIa as part of a mature MTP. Of 228 MTP activations, 117 patients were candidates for rFVIIa, and, of these, 39 patients received rFVIIa under the MTP. Comparing patients who received rFVIIa with those who did not based on initial packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion requirements, therewas no difference in mortality for transfusions ≤ 20 units (25 vs 24%, 24-hour; 25 vs 42%, 30-day) or 21 to 30 units (33 vs 47%, 24-hour; 55 vs 50%, 30-day). For initial requirement ≥ 30 units of PRBCs, 24-hour mortality (26 vs 64%, P = 0.02) was significantly decreased in patients that received rFVIIa (n = 19) compared with those who did not (n = 17). These mortality differences were not maintained at 30 days (68 vs 71%). rFVIIa had minimal clinical impact on outcomes for patients requiring less than 30 units of PRBCs. For patients transfused more than 30 units of PRBCs, differences in 24-hour and 30-day mortality suggest that rFVIIa converted early deaths from exsanguination to late deaths from multiorgan failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1043-1049
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume77
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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    Morse, B. C., Dente, C. J., Hodgman, E. I., Shaz, B. H., Nicholas, J. M., Wyrzykowski, A. D., Salomone, J. P., Vercruysse, G. A., Rozycki, G. S., & Feliciano, D. V. (2011). The effects of protocolized use of recombinant factor VIIa within a massive transfusion protocol in a civilian level I trauma center. American Surgeon, 77(8), 1043-1049.